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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
im thinking about getting the Aspec springs, its not a huge drop and it should be nice for performance. i want any changes i do to be perfect. so im wondering if a cambering kit is needed for the Aspec.
also, im going to be putting on 19 inch rims once the winter is over. so if i have larger rims (ill try to keep the over all diameter close to stock, as in shorter rubber) and i have new springs, which way and which things are going to be affected?
i think ill need a cambering kit, although i hear its not needed with aspec but ill have new rims... and ill need an alignment.

overall, what should i look for, should i need a camber kit, and is there any changes with a rear sway bar in regards to problems that could occur. the rear sway is another consideration that id throw in.

Thanks in advance, please help
TSX Cman
 

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I see contradicting statements everywhere in your post. Sorry, I can't comprehend what you're trying to achieve.

First off, changing springs only without the ASpec shocks is not considered "perfect" IMO. I'll suggest you get the wheels first, and check how much gap you have before lowering you car with whatever spring you like matched with the OEM shocks.

Whether you need a camber kit or not can only be answered by yourself after you made the changes. Some people want a camber kit, some people don't. Some people like the affected/change camber and some people don't.

While changing the stabilizer bar affects the bias of how the car handles, what exactly are you trying to achieve? Sorry, there is no perfect to me neither is there a set standard to follow.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
hmm. i didnt read over my post.
i want springs, and rear sway, for handling
i want big ass wheels to look good.
im hoping they all mesh quite nice together. so your saying, put it on and see if i need a cambering kit.
pretty simple explanation
 

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You can do it 2 ways, put everything on and then learn how to drive with it and/or replace if you don't like or you can do it "gradually".

Take one modification at a time and then move on from there. Since you want large wheels, start with getting that right.

And if you need to further improve your handling. Get a stabilizer bar if you feel that the understeer isn't what you desire or something you want to reduce. Then get springs if you find that the ride height should be lower.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
sounds right, but the thing about doing stuff gradually is that i could skip that if i can find poeople that have already experienced it. and less understeer is quite fine due to the front wheel drive, if the back ever gets out of control, can always give a pump on the gas pedal. its not quite necessary, but hell, thats why its a consideration
 

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One thing about tuning is, never based it on someone elses' experience or opinion unless you're absolutely sure that is exactly what it will do. Handling to me is unique to everyone, one setting may work for you but not work for another (vice-versa). Also replacing or modifying X amount of components doesn't necessary mean it's the "best" to approach handling tuning. There is also no one approach to setting a car up.

TSX Cman said:
less understeer is quite fine due to the front wheel drive, if the back ever gets out of control, can always give a pump on the gas pedal.
You're relating a more common FR characteristic with a FF. "Giving more gas" or accelerating when your rear end is kicking out on FF has quite opposite dynamics to what you mentioned.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
if we are on the same understanding, im ognna guess that FR is front engine rear wheel. if your back end is spinning sideways on a rear wheel and you gas it, i know the contact patch will grow due to the weight transfer so that COULD help, but the fact that your spinning it harder while its already not gripping will swing you around harder than you were before.
but ive noticed that with the tsx, only on slippery surfaces, when bleeping the gas, the weight transfers still to the rear wheels, and plants those bad asses still rather than letting them slip out further.
if i e brake a turn, i usually give it a pump of brake rather than leave it locked, and if i want to striaghten out i gas pump, if i want to keep spinning i gas it and leave the back tires locked up.

and there are many ways to look at this between proper racing physics/experience/fluke accidents. and just so we dont have a huge arguement, theres also small factors such as stomping the peddle and having too much spin, compared to bleeping it for traction.

And the original issue of modding, your point is correct about to each his own/ each car being slightly different. so i may have to take the route of learning from experience. but im gonna havce a shitty winter till may, so im not worried now, i was just thinking about ordering stuff while on limited deals
 

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Noel said:
... Whether you need a camber kit or not can only be answered by yourself after you made the changes. Some people want a camber kit, some people don't. Some people like the affected/change camber and some people don't. ...
I thought that there is more to a camber kit than just what it feels like. I was under the impression that it's needed to reduce the load on suspension, excessive wheel bearings and tire usage.
Then again, my "suspension research" is far from over.
I'm willing to absorb any information I can get on this subject.

Do you know if Acura recommends and/or installs a camber kit with their complete A-spec package ?
 

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Acura does not install a camber kit with their Aspec package. The Aspec suspension does not significantly lower the car and it *should* still be within specifications. However, in actual practice, some TSXs already have camber in excess of specifications stock from the factory and the Aspec suspension will only make it worse. As of now, Acura has no fix for this condition and the camber on the rear suspension cannot really be adjusted. Acura obviously would not recommend an aftermarket camber kit. However, IMO, using an aftermkt camber adjustment kit is not only a viable solution, but the only solution since Acura does not have a fix.

As for Noel's comments, he's basically saying that there is no right amt of camber for everyone. Some actually like the greater negative camber resulting from lowering your car for various reasons. It can improve your handling and it may allow you to run larger rims/tires w/o scraping against the wheel well. The trade off is increased inner tire wear. Some are into keeping their car within factory specifications for a balance of handling/tire wear that is appropriate for a street driven vehicle.

With respect to excessive wear on wheel bearings, I am sure that the Aspec suspension would have a negligible effect on this. After all, we are talking about a suspension package designed by Honda engineers. Using a wheel with an offset too far off from stock would place a greater load on the wheel bearings.
 

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Thanks AlterZgo, great post - exactly what I was looking for. :thumbsup:

I kind of figured that a package designed by Honda would not push the car (too far) beyond the specs. I just wasn't sure if the camber kit was a part of it.
 
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