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flashprroooooo!!!
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Discussion Starter #1
anyone run these with good or bad experiences? i've noticed people who tend to run these also have oil catch cans, or they're not running oil catch cans but have a custom CAI where they delete the vacuum hose running from the valve cover to the intake.

as with any mod, there seems to be mixed feedback both good and bad. tried looking up some stuff on k20a.org and online. found some of these links.

valve cover breather - K20A.org .:. The K Series Source . Honda / Acura K20a k24a Engine Forum
K&N breather filter for kseries valve cover - K20A.org .:. The K Series Source . Honda / Acura K20a k24a Engine Forum
are breather filter bad?? - Club RSX Message Board
Breather filters = bad? - ClubIntegra.com - Acura Integra Forum

fyi, i'm working on a diy intake. in the end, i may just drill out a hole and use a grommet/tube for that crankcase hose anyways. but i was interested in getting some feedback about the breather filter. thanks.
 

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, Chief SuperModerator, Info Center / Car Care & D
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Is there an advantage on running the breather filters?
 

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Bardi
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I have been runing the K&N one for months. Ran other cars with them for years. People talk out of their ass when it comes to these, and say they are horrible, but I like to keep oil out of my intake manifold. If you do this mod and not disconenect the PVC line to your intake manifold, then you will draw in from the VC filter at idle. A catch can setup is best if you do this and keep the PVC line not attached into the IM. This way you wont draw oil vapors into your IM. I have been running just the breather filter now. I will do a catch can one of these days.
 

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flashprroooooo!!!
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Discussion Starter #5
the one advantage might be the crap that's getting blown out into the intake so it can go into the combustion chamber for emissions (if i'm even explaining it right). some people say there is build-up of stuff in their intake tubes or TB's (seafoam treatment for carbon buildup?).

but if you're using the filter, the stuff getting expunged from the crankcase basically just goes into the air. filter picks up some of it, but i suppose a little would leak out and build up some residue where ever it goes. i've also read you may not pass smog with them. any truth to that?
 

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Its meant for negative crank case pressure, I think its useless since if theres a hole there pressure will go to the place of least resistance. I disconnected mine on all my cars, if your running a boosted setup I would recommend using a catch can. Otherwise a filter is fine. As for smog I have no idea since I dont need that crap :p

EDIT: I just read on of those links: http://forums.clubrsx.com/showthread.php?t=57688

This is BS and im not sure how he thinks its positive pressure but its not. Take a rubber hose and drill a hole in the side of it towards the middle. Suck in on one side and Ill bet youll feel a vacuum on that hole you drilled ;)
 

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ive always wondered to myself about this actually.

i always thought they had the breather going to the intake for a reason.

surely with it connected to the intake pipe the effect of the air passing the end of the breather pipe would draw the oil up the breather pipe and into the intake much like wind does when it blows over a chimney to draw out the smoke.

with just a breather on there is no draw on the oil vapours so is this a bad thing?

do you need oil vapours in the intake??

would it help lube the throttle body?

does it help aid in the burning or maybe help by prolonging the pre ignition of the fuel?

honestly i have no idea but its just thoughts that run through my head. so for that reason i like to keep mine connected

just to edit, even after reading the links youve posted it still leaves me confused.
 

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ive always wondered to myself about this actually.

i always thought they had the breather going to the intake for a reason.

surely with it connected to the intake pipe the effect of the air passing the end of the breather pipe would draw the oil up the breather pipe and into the intake much like wind does when it blows over a chimney to draw out the smoke.

with just a breather on there is no draw on the oil vapours so is this a bad thing?

do you need oil vapours in the intake??

would it help lube the throttle body?

does it help aid in the burning or maybe help by prolonging the pre ignition of the fuel?

honestly i have no idea but its just thoughts that run through my head. so for that reason i like to keep mine connected

just to edit, even after reading the links youve posted it still leaves me confused.
You dont want oil in your intake period, no ifs ands or buts. You loose power by burning oil. Your vapors in the crank case are vented by your PCV if there is a build up that valve will open and release it.

EDIT:
Is there an advantage on running the breather filters?
Yes you dont burn oil, or less at least. Intake, TB and Mani all stay cleaner
 

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You dont want oil in your intake period, no ifs ands or buts. You loose power by burning oil. Your vapors in the crank case are vented by your PCV if there is a build up that valve will open and release it.

EDIT:

Yes you dont burn oil, or less at least. Intake, TB and Mani all stay cleaner
see still confused as i have no idea what the pcv is
 

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The biggest thing with running a breather on your VC is the more that is vented from the system. The more it will stink. Meaning the volume of crank pressure coming out.
There is no real benefit to having it routed back into the intake. While it will keep the air cleaner, your motor isnt to fond of the knock filled oil/water vapor the normal vaccuum line is pulling back into the engine. In stock form the system was designed to work fine. The more the engine is modified the more PCV you will have to account for.

There are many ways you can run breathers and catch can setups. The argument can go both ways. In the end it comes down to what you feel is best for your setup.

Close to stock im sure the breather on the VC will go unnoticed. If you have ITB setup you may not want the filter on the VC since the fumes could be ingested.
With boost it may smell a bit. Which is why on a DD you may want to attach a hose to the vent on the VC and run the breather under the car away from your nose. Or you can conjur up a venturi style setup and let the exhaust vacuum pull the vapor in.

No matter what you decide the only way to know if your venting the system properly is to put a vacuum boost gauge in line while your making whatever system you dream up. A system that always stays in vacuum is ideal.
 

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The biggest thing with running a breather on your VC is the more that is vented from the system. The more it will stink. Meaning the volume of crank pressure coming out.
There is no real benefit to having it routed back into the intake. While it will keep the air cleaner, your motor isnt to fond of the knock filled oil/water vapor the normal vaccuum line is pulling back into the engine. In stock form the system was designed to work fine. The more the engine is modified the more PCV you will have to account for.

There are many ways you can run breathers and catch can setups. The argument can go both ways. In the end it comes down to what you feel is best for your setup.

Close to stock im sure the breather on the VC will go unnoticed. If you have ITB setup you may not want the filter on the VC since the fumes could be ingested.
With boost it may smell a bit. Which is why on a DD you may want to attach a hose to the vent on the VC and run the breather under the car away from your nose. Or you can conjur up a venturi style setup and let the exhaust vacuum pull the vapor in.

No matter what you decide the only way to know if your venting the system properly is to put a vacuum boost gauge in line while your making whatever system you dream up. A system that always stays in vacuum is ideal.
Very true except for the bold part, thats extremely difficult to do in the real world :/ Thats why many High HP guys on big motors and blowers run an electric vacuum pump to keep the vacuum up
 

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I dont see whats hard about it. If the system is gaining pressure you find a way to relieve it.

My setup needed 2 -4 out of the vc ran to the smelly tank with a 2" Filter to vent properly.

A guy I work with has 1300HP engines that he just lets vent straight to the ground with 2" lines each VC to vent properly.
 

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I dont see whats hard about it. If the system is gaining pressure you find a way to relieve it.

My setup needed 2 -4 out of the vc ran to the smelly tank with a 2" Filter to vent properly.

A guy I work with has 1300HP engines that he just lets vent straight to the ground with 2" lines each VC to vent properly.
Once you are in WOT your vacuum goes very close to atmospheric pressure, which is normal. So its hard to keep it in vacuum when under WOT loads, and boosted applications.
 

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Once you are in WOT your vacuum goes very close to atmospheric pressure, which is normal. So its hard to keep it in vacuum when under WOT loads, and boosted applications.
To keep it from going into positive pressure you vent and check valve as necessary. Im not going to drag this on like the last thread.

Edit: Me not being clear enough I'll edit my post. An ideal setups keeps you out of the positive side of the spectrum.

Big difference between a guage reading 0 when WOT and + anything.
0psi wont shoot your dipstick into the hood and spew oil everywhere like + will
 

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flashprroooooo!!!
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Discussion Starter #16
i saw that k20a thread about the oil catch can. either that one, or another, was piggy backing a lot off of the a-zine/jtso oil catch can DIY.

i think i may do this the next time i go to HD. looking at some of the pics of the gunk building up in IM's isn't pretty.
 

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i saw that k20a thread about the oil catch can. either that one, or another, was piggy backing a lot off of the a-zine/jtso oil catch can DIY.

i think i may do this the next time i go to HD. looking at some of the pics of the gunk building up in IM's isn't pretty.
Its worth it, our PCV system is crap its where alot of oil is lost in the k series.

To keep it from going into positive pressure you vent and check valve as necessary. Im not going to drag this on like the last thread.

Edit: Me not being clear enough I'll edit my post. An ideal setups keeps you out of the positive side of the spectrum.

Big difference between a guage reading 0 when WOT and + anything.
0psi wont shoot your dipstick into the hood and spew oil everywhere like + will
Your forgetting though that in a boosted application your vacuum reading is actually boost. The entire vacuum system is pressurized, the reason your dipstick doesnt pop out is because your PCV closes, thats why you want the vent on the valve cover.
 

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Your forgetting though that in a boosted application your vacuum reading is actually boost. The entire vacuum system is pressurized, the reason your dipstick doesnt pop out is because your PCV closes, thats why you want the vent on the valve cover.
This is so far from correct its not even funny.
Every car runs in vaccum. Only a turbo car can push it beyond that. Even in a boosted car if your just cruising along you will be in vacuum on the highway.

On one side you have a PCV valve. On the other you have the vaccum line going into the intake.
The vaccum line being sucked by the intake will keep the system in vacuum. When the system seems positive pressure the PCV "check valve" closes and now the system is still being pulled in vacuum by the intake.

Now if you over run the system by modifying the amount of air going in the engine. Larger turbo then it came with. You will need to modify the PCV system. If you do not and you leave it stock at some point your dipstick will hit the hood. You will build pressure in the crankcase faster then you can let it out.
 

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Yeah.... Your not at WOT, your not spooling so your in vacuum, once you crack the throttle and you start building boost there is no longer any vacuum.


Most boosted cars dont modify there PCV theres no reason to do so, all they do is attach a hose to it and allow it to dump onto the ground or into a can. Same goes for the valve cover vent. It doesnt need vacuum to work correctly.

This is my last post on this, im not about to argue over the internet about something ive done (and thousands of others) numerous times to numerous different cars and tracked them many many times.

Edit:
You dont even need a PCV at all, if you have enough vents on the valve cover to support the pressure. These are two completely different systems, they are combined at the factory for emissions reasons. As long as its vented you are completely fine. Pressure WILL go to easiest less restrictive route.

http://www.k20a.org/forum/showthread.php?t=95233
 

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Yeah.... Your not at WOT, your not spooling so your in vacuum, once you crack the throttle and you start building boost there is no longer any vacuum.

Common sense

Most boosted cars dont modify there PCV theres no reason to do so, all they do is attach a hose to it and allow it to dump onto the ground or into a can. Same goes for the valve cover vent. It doesnt need vacuum to work correctly.

Wrong again... Any turbo car with a MAF cannot vent to ground and must keep vacuum on the system

Edit:
You dont even need a PCV at all, if you have enough vents on the valve cover to support the pressure.

Boost and PCV? - K20A.org .:. The K Series Source . Honda / Acura K20a k24a Engine Forum

I've already made this point
I dont know why I try to add my 2 sense and you feel the need to clarify or scrutinize it but its getting old.
 
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