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Discussion Starter #1
What do you all think about a diesel in the tsx. I was over on the honda uk site and they have as an option a diesel....

Would you want a diesel?
 

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Not for me. Diesel isn't much cheaper here and harder to find. Fuel is much more expensive in Europe, so the cost savings is more significant. Also, it would have been tougher to live with a diesel in the cold winter we've had this year.
 

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Just a little nutty
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Sorry, same opinion as above. Diesel might be a good fit for some people but I'm not one of them. I would love the diesel gas MPG (and the torque) but the noise, repair costs, and the availability of diesel fuel is a concern for me.
 

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kiteboy said:
Not for me. Diesel isn't much cheaper here and harder to find. Fuel is much more expensive in Europe, so the cost savings is more significant. Also, it would have been tougher to live with a diesel in the cold winter we've had this year.
On newer cars, you don't have to worry about diesel engines in the winter. However, your other points are correct... good luck in finding a place that carries diesel when you're on a roadtrip, and the fuel gauge reads "E".
 

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I just read a small article in this months issue of Wards Auto World that is titled "Firing on Fewer Cylinders." It's not available online just yet but here is an excerpt;

"Cylinder deactivation - tried once by General Motors Corp. in the early 1980s woith essentially disasterous results - returns with much more convincing potential, thanks to sophisticated electronic controls and actuators unavailable when GM experimented with the concept two decades ago."

"GM, the most vocal proponent of new-age cylinder deactivation technology, which it dubs Displacement on Demand (DOD), says it will deliver a fuel economy improvement of around 6% to 8% for engines so-equipped."

It goes on to talk about how they are in a race with Chrysler who plans to introduce it this spring while GM won't be releasing theirs until late summer. But here is the most interesting part to this story that most here should find relevant.

"Honda Motor Co. Ltd. also will launch this year a new overhead-cam V-6 with Variable Cylinder Management (VCM). shutting down three of the engine's six cylinders when not needed, as part of a hybrid electric drivetrain for Accord."

An editorial in the same issue sites that "Chrysler and GM are introducing engine technology that will conserve more gasoline than hybrids over the next few years. Have you heard of it? Probably not."

"That's because the media have chosen to all but ignore it, even though it far more practical than expensive hybrid technology, which adds $3,000 to $4,000 to a vehicle's cost and whose real-world fuel savings are overrated."

"Meanwhile this alternative technology costs about $100 per engine dnd proimises to improve fuel economy 6% to 20% on America's thirstest vehicles."

I guess the reason I mention all this is the need or lack of it for diesel engines. I still remember when cars were hugh and averaging about 9-12mpg. When the Asian models came out, the numbers soared to 20-27mpg, at the time it was a tremendous improvement.

Unfortuantely today, most people are driving SUVs and large trucks, or the equivialant CAFE of the gas guzziling cars from the 60's and 70's. Diesels were a quick and dirty fix during a time when fuel saving technology was in its infancy. Yes, I know diesels are cleaner today and widely used in Europe but this too is temporary. The future is in multi valve or displacment engines (IMO).
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I understand the need for multivalve displacement engines but the same thing can be accomplished with forced induction (turbo) or supercharger?
 
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