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Discussion Starter #1
Probably a longshot, but does anyone on the forum knows anything about diesel tuning? I kniow it's not that common in the US.
Ideally I would reflash my ECU, but I'd probably need another cable, I currently have an ELM327 OBD2 but I don't think the cable is capable of flashing. So suggestions about which device, which program to use would be most appreciated. :)
Also does anyone knows if it's a tough job cleaning the injectors?
 

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Wrong place man ) There r no Honda diesels in US , its for EDM only, nor any reflash for your car. Enjoy your economy or jump on petrol engine to enjoy fun and power )

And as for tune , its all the same , more pressure + more fuel = more power but i havent heard that any engine management available for Honda diesels.
 

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Tuning box, bit of a crude upgrade but they work.

On the accord im not sure if there is a re-mappable ecu available for the diesel models.

Also believe it or not they respond very well to an uprated intake ;).
 

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Tuning diesel cars isn't common here but we do tune and drag race our diesel trucks. Most common thing is to chip it, essentially giving the driver limited tuning abilities. But I don't think they make chips for the edm accord.

Intake, custom headers, larger exhaust piping, larger injectors, hotter glow plugs. Upgrading the turbo, if it has one, would help.

Believe it or not, a well tuned diesel can out perform a tuned gas car, both in engine output and economy.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thanks for the info you all. I've chosen to go with the chiptuning. I'm a little sceptic about re-mapping my ECU myself, because I don't know jack sh*t about it.
 

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Tuning diesel cars isn't common here but we do tune and drag race our diesel trucks. Most common thing is to chip it, essentially giving the driver limited tuning abilities. But I don't think they make chips for the edm accord.

Intake, custom headers, larger exhaust piping, larger injectors, hotter glow plugs. Upgrading the turbo, if it has one, would help.

Believe it or not, a well tuned diesel can out perform a tuned gas car, both in engine output and economy.
lol hotter glow plugs.. glow plugs are used for cold start only. they serve no purpose after that and are not used in the combustion process.. thats purely pressure.
 

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erik, honda makes a ton of diesel engines, im sure there is a tuning capacity somewhere in europe.. even shops that my deal with it more specifically, i would see what they have as far using what you have.,
 

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lol hotter glow plugs.. glow plugs are used for cold start only. they serve no purpose after that and are not used in the combustion process.. thats purely pressure.
You are correct for stock diesels. But on specialized or tuned diesels, a higher output glowplug is used for a more consistent and effiecent burn upon combustion. Kubota does this for all hydrolic equipped diesel tractors, drag trucks use them as well. Works even better with propane injection.
 

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You are correct for stock diesels. But on specialized or tuned diesels, a higher output glowplug is used for a more consistent and effiecent burn upon combustion. Kubota does this for all hydrolic equipped diesel tractors, drag trucks use them as well. Works even better with propane injection.
diesels fire on compression not glowplugs im afraid.
 

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Older diesels do. Companies are adding glowplugs these days. Cummings and Ford do it for emmissions.

As a certified and current diesel mechanic, i can tell you first hand this is incorrect.

Glow plugs are used on modern diesels for quickly warming the latent air/fuel mixture already in the cylinders during a cold-start. They aren't anything new, we have a 94 7.3 Ford Powerstroke at work with glow plugs.

There are electronic-ignition diesels, but they are lower compression industrial models for the most part.

Ford Powerstrokes and Cummins (not cummings) do not use an electrical ignition system, they do have glow plugs for the above stated reason however.

The Honda diesel engines are "N" series (U.S. TSX are of course K Series". N-series all use common-rail direct injection (like Cummins) running fuel pressures of 22,000+ PSI. This is not a typo. Those kinds of pressures during the direct injection process combined with the N's 16:1+ compression causes the mixture to ignite itself. Hence your standard compression-ignition diesel. Absolutely no electronic ignition.

Its okay though, many people don't understand how glow-plugs are used and assume they work similarly to spark plugs.


Anyhow..... upgrading injectors and retarding injection timing, along with upping the boost on the N-series will yield more power, diesel tuning is much easier than gas. The only problem I can see however is that they use aluminum blocks instead of the standard cast iron most commonly used in diesels.
 

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Actually most computer controlled, common rail high pressure fuel injection diesels do not have glow plugs these days.

They use a grid heater in the intake tract (usually mounted right in the intake manifold) to heat the incoming air for cold starts & cold temperature operation.

The 5.9L Cummins in the Dodge light trucks have never had glow plugs, just grid heaters. The Duramax initially had large glow plugs with no grid heaters, then small glow plugs with a grid heater & now no glow plugs. The Ford Powerstroke 6.0L & 6.4L had glow plugs but I don't think the current 6.7L Powerstroke does.

Here is a pic (upper) of the current 6.7L in-line 6 cylinder Cummins diesel grid heater in the intake manifold. (Just for reference in the picture, the grid heater is about 6" x 3".)

The earlier 5.9L Cummins diesel was very similar.
It draws about 100 amps when the engine is cold, hence a huge alternator & 2 batteries.
The lower part of the picture shows the grid heater removed for greater air flow.



The grid heater strategy is much simpler & nearly as effective as glow plugs. The less parts in the combustion chamber the better! The 2005-06 Duramax's had a problem with the glow plug tips breaking off in the combustion chamber with disastrous results. Plus servicing the glow plugs for each cylinder is not easy as you can imagine.


I have a 2004 Dodge Cummins with a ton of aftermarket stuff including 2 big spinning things but that's for another forum!!
 

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You are correct for stock diesels. But on specialized or tuned diesels, a higher output glowplug is used for a more consistent and effiecent burn upon combustion. Kubota does this for all hydrolic equipped diesel tractors, drag trucks use them as well. Works even better with propane injection.
lol ......btw.. i used to race trucks.. diesel was my first love. my 97 powerstroke ( last of the good ones) ran consistent 11.50's
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Thanks...

Thanks again all for your help. Especially the post from adamlee05, where he sheds some light on the matter.
I will also be cleaning out my EGR valve and passageways as I suspect there's some performance degradation from built up dirt.

@adamlee05:

Retarding Injection timing and upping the boost can be done by reprogramming the ECU?
Or do I have to use a bigger turbo for more boost?
 

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lol ......btw.. i used to race trucks.. diesel was my first love. my 97 powerstroke ( last of the good ones) ran consistent 11.50's


Race mine still, haven't gotten into the 11s yet. It's sad that Ford dropped the 7.3.
 

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Thanks again all for your help. Especially the post from adamlee05, where he sheds some light on the matter.
I will also be cleaning out my EGR valve and passageways as I suspect there's some performance degradation from built up dirt.

@adamlee05:

Retarding Injection timing and upping the boost can be done by reprogramming the ECU?
Or do I have to use a bigger turbo for more boost?
You'll only want to retard the injection timing if you're compensating with more boost. Retarding under the same PSI as before will result in a loss of power and a lot of unburned fuel.

I'm not familiar with the Honda L diesel engine configuration and design that much, so I'm unsure how it controls its boost levels. If its a conventional wastegate/BOV system you can modify the release parameters for increased pressure. I'm pretty sure the L's are aftercooled, so you'd need to make sure your system can keep the charge temperatures within reasonable levels.

As far as injection timing, since its a common rail system its going to be electronically injected, hence controlled by the ECU. Retarding your injection timing should be fairly easy using something similar to the AEM F/IC which intercepts the ECU's injector signal then sends its own signal at a later time giving you a controlled retardation. How this would interface with the EDM diesel ECU I'm unsure about. I'm willing to bet there are systems in Europe already developed for use in various small diesel auto's to do this, just look around.

You'll also need to increase the fuel when upping the boost and retarding the timing. Increasing the boost with OR without retarding the timing is just going to cause a lean condition and eventually destroy your motor (probably sooner than later). Here in the states a common way to increase the fuel is to increase injector duty or buy larger injectors, commonly referred to as "x horse injectors", the x representing a number of horsepower approximately gained using those injectors.

The first thing I would look into honestly would be the strength of the block. As said before, the L's use a special aluminum block, not the much stronger iron commonly used in diesel.

@ Calgary - I somehow forgot the 5.9's didn't use GP's. The last time I was working with a 5.9 was our modified 12 valve P-pump 5.9 stroked to a 6.2 running 94psi and John Deere injectors :) The head had been modified to accept 2 GP's per cylinder as the compression was "low" @ 12.4:1 to accept the high boost. She ran 10.6's. You're right about the ford 6.7's, they don't use GP's.

WHOA TSXDIESELCLUB. back on track.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
^^^^
This all makes sense.
I'm not sure if I can find out how strong the block is; Maybe I can find out on the honda site or maybe look for someone who has done something like this already.
I will start by cleaning up the engine first as I'm convinced the engine is not performing as well as it should be right now.
Sometimes it will push me back in my seat sometimes it won't.
Also the engine has some hickups when I'm at 1900 till 2100 rpm driving at a steady pace. Giving it more air seems to be working, after I'd replaced the filter it was somehow less present, but i only have driven 2000 miles since then and it's happening again.
Also used wynce for cleaning out my injectors but that didn't help much.
 

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and dont forget to get yourself a big ol' FMIC XD I wish the US would hurry up and get on the 'small block' diesel scene already.
 
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