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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello everyone!
With the recent post about someone being charged an absolutely insane amount of money for an alternator change at the dealer, I thought I would interject a little how-to, to the forum since I had an alternator on its last leg that would charge well sometimes but weak at others. With me taking a trip north soon I figured it would be a perfect time for it to quit on me, and leave me on the side of the road in the middle of nowhere. So out with the old, in with the new.

I started by researching for the alternator itself. After doing some research on alternators themselves I came to the conclusion that there isn’t any slightly larger Amperage alt that is used on any Honda/Acura that will fit the TSX. So that left me with just replacing the stock with one with the same 110amp output. There are many aftermarket options for the TSX but at the moment I didn’t have the funds for that option.

With what kind of alt I was going to go with chosen, I started researching parts stores in my area. The decision to purchase an alt locally is because unlike other parts that you can see wearing out that can be ordered ahead of time, an alt TYPICALLY dies instantly, and without warning. This coupled with me going through alternators in almost a yearly basis, I need to be able to swap this part out locally and quickly when it dies. If you don’t purchase locally you have to mail the part or wait for a new part to be mailed while the car sits.

I contacted the typical parts stores, Autozone, Pep Boys, NAPA and Orileys. The prices for a remanufactured unit ran from $160-120 with warranties ranging from 3year to lifetime. I decided to go with Autozone because they had the lowest price and best warranty and also price match. To find the absolute best price for the alternator I did an easy Google search and @partsgeek.com they have remanufactured alternators for $94. So after the dust settled I have an alternator that has a lifetime warranty for only $100!

Now to the actual work:
Tools Needed:
Deep Well 12mm
Shallow 12mm
Deep Well 11mm
Shallow 10mm
Shallow 14mm
1in Extension
Flathead Screwdriver
Serpentine Belt Tool (OEM#27115) I borrowed this tool from autozone and in the end it didn’t cost anything but is absolutely needed to get a socket on the tensioner to remove the belt.

1. Start by disconnecting the battery (negative first!)
2. Remove battery and all of the plastic tray and guard
3. Remove front plastic where hood latch is. There are various plastic push pins, use a flathead screwdriver to pry all them up and remove plastic piece.
4. Remove bolts holding radiator and disconnect connectors running to electric fans. This will allow you a little more movement. Once this is done it just lifts (slightly) out of its resting place and you can push it toward the driver side. DO NOT DISCONNECT ANYTHING ELSE OR DRAIN THE RADIATOR. Although this would be a good time for this, it is not needed. It is just to create more room to make it much easier to remove and reinstall the alternator. A buddy will be helpful to hold this during the removal and replacement of the alternator.
5. At this point you are ready to move the belt. Use the serpentine belt tool and a 14mm short well socket, while pulling downward remove the belt. You don’t have to completely remove the belt, I just took it off and shoved it toward the firewall out of the way. This makes it easier later to put it back on.
6. At this point pull the two 12mm bolts holding the power steering pump. DO NOT DISCONNECT LINES. This again allows room to remove alt.
7. Next disconnect the plug going to the alt and remove the screw holding the wire on the side of the alt.
8. Now you are ready to pull the alternator. Use a 12mm shallow with the 1in extension to remove the top bolt and the two bottom bolts (A TRUE MF’er) the bottom two bolts are not very easy to get at for a guy with fat fingers and hands (this is the part that Japanese people say “haha fat American nevar get dis!” So a friend with small hands makes this portion much easier.) It looks like it will be so much easier if the design didn’t put the AC pump connections right in front of the bolts to the Alt. DO NOT REMOVE THE CONNECTIONS TO THE AC COMPRESSOR. If you do then it is going to have to be taken to a mechanic to have the AC drained and refilled, costing more money.
9. Do all steps backwards to replace PS pump, radiator, and battery

I’m writing this HOW-To after the fact so I didn’t get any pictures but there really isn’t any needed. If you follow the steps correctly and disconnect everything you should be able to figure it out. If you have the tools to do this, you have the ability.

These steps worked for me and instead of paying $900+ for an alternator change it cost me $100 and a few hours of an afternoon.

I hope this helps someone. If anyone thinks there is a step or a little piece of info that will make this job easier in the future comment and I’ll add it in there that way this info will be correct and last for all future members needing this info.

Remember-Rep+ 
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
i feed them to my dog lol

With my harley truck i ran a VERY LARGE sound system including 3 batteries, compressor, HID, 5 TVs ranging from 15-47in, and anywhere from 3-6 amps producing in the neighborhood of 2100-7100 watts depending on setups. On the car I recently downsized to a smaller setup of a JL 1200.1HD and JL 600.4HD and no other accessories. So hopfully I wont have to change alts on the TSX as often. But we shall see.
 

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Thanks for the write up. I didn't know about this thread when I did mine upgrading to an alternator with high amp output, but stumbled across it doing my it for a friend. Having the serpentine belt tool set made the biggest difference, could've used pics for radiator fan removal, but I never did it that way either time. It's frustrating as it takes patience, proper angles and really tight clearances. Only thing I did differently was moving the power steering reservoir and the wiper fluid reservoir. Thanks again for sharing!
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks for the write up. I didn't know about this thread when I did mine upgrading to an alternator with high amp output, but stumbled across it doing my it for a friend. Having the serpentine belt tool set made the biggest difference, could've used pics for radiator fan removal, but I never did it that way either time. It's frustrating as it takes patience, proper angles and really tight clearances. Only thing I did differently was moving the power steering reservoir and the wiper fluid reservoir. Thanks again for sharing!
:tu:

Glad someone got some use out of this


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