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Just curious - what kind of hack method lets you replace the clutch without removing the transmission? That seems impossible.
Remove suspension stuff on the driver's side, that allows you to unbolt and slide the tranny outboard... that leaves enough room between the motor and tranny to R&R both the clutch and flywheel. It's on youtube.
 

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I can only assume you haven't done any of the maintenance to it. Trans fluid (although should be okay at 100k miles) should be replaced every 50k miles or so. I'm guessing there's some contamination that contributed to early wear. Like I said, I've had cars with 200k miles on stock clutch (my dad's Focus ST is now over 215k miles and still on stock clutch, and both me and my brother learned manual in that car lol)
It's a manual, hence clutch. Doesn't use transmission fluid, only gearbox oil. The gear oil has nothing at all to do with the clutch and does not come in contact with it unless there's a seal leak (that would ruin the clutch).

There's no maintenance for a clutch, it just comes down to how you drive it. Gentle is better than agggresive, highway is better than city, skill is better than no skill.

You should change the clutch cylinder fluid every three years (just like brakes, same fluid) to preserve the MC and slave, but again that doesn't affect the clutch itself only the MC/slave. You could probably get away with five years in a very dry climate.
 

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Discussion Starter · #23 ·
It's a manual, hence clutch. Doesn't use transmission fluid, only gearbox oil. The gear oil has nothing at all to do with the clutch and does not come in contact with it unless there's a seal leak (that would ruin the clutch).

There's no maintenance for a clutch, it just comes down to how you drive it. Gentle is better than agggresive, highway is better than city, skill is better than no skill.

You should change the clutch cylinder fluid every three years (just like brakes, same fluid) to preserve the MC and slave, but again that doesn't affect the clutch itself only the MC/slave. You could probably get away with five years in a very dry climate.
I've been driving a clutch my entire life and know what I'm doing, I guess I thought it would last longer but I do tend to drive a little hard sometimes! Thanks for replying.
Now I know where you're coming from. Those dealership quotes sound outrageous. I don't know much about clutches since I have an auto. Definitely go to a reputable exhaust shop and see what actually needs replacing. I still find it hard to fathom that a whole exhaust system would need replacing without a second opinion.
They are telling me that all the flanges are rusted and therefore the pipes and everything connected to them need replacement, does that make sense?
 

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Absolutely makes sense. If the damage is that severe then the extent of replacing as much of the exhaust as needed will warrant a much higher cost. You now can compare what the dealer quoted with what an independent exhaust shop charges. Another difference will be that the independent shop can tailor it more to your liking if you want.

Keep in mind that if it's just surface rust then you shouldn't need any replacing because that's normal. But if the rust has caused a lot of damage and ruined the integrity of your exhaust system then replacing damaged parts makes sense. I've had exhaust systems where the bolts rusted but the exhaust system was still intact. I just cut off the bolts and replaced them with new bolts. Also. if the exhaust is that badly rusted then you may want to take a closer look at your underbody/suspension as you may have other serious rust issues.
 

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Discussion Starter · #25 ·
Absolutely makes sense. If the damage is that severe then the extent of replacing as much of the exhaust as needed will warrant a much higher cost. You now can compare what the dealer quoted with what an independent exhaust shop charges. Another difference will be that the independent shop can tailor it more to your liking if you want.

Keep in mind that if it's just surface rust then you shouldn't need any replacing because that's normal. But if the rust has caused a lot of damage and ruined the integrity of your exhaust system then replacing damaged parts makes sense. I've had exhaust systems where the bolts rusted but the exhaust system was still intact. I just cut off the bolts and replaced them with new bolts. Also. if the exhaust is that badly rusted then you may want to take a closer look at your underbody/suspension as you may have other serious rust issues.
Thank.you, yes they found a small rust spot on the underbody as well so you are correct!
 

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Thanks, I will have a look at YouTube. Still if you are doing that much why not just drop the trans out of the way? Not that much more work, maybe pop the driveshafts out and disconnect shift linkage? Doesn’t seem like a huge time saver but maybe. I need to replace the clutch soon which is why I am interested.


Remove suspension stuff on the driver's side, that allows you to unbolt and slide the tranny outboard... that leaves enough room between the motor and tranny to R&R both the clutch and flywheel. It's on youtube.
 

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just have them cut the flanges out and weld sleeves to couple the pipes. Throw a 4-2-1 exhaust manifold while you’re in there. The flanges always seem to rot quickly compared to the rest of the pipe
 
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