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Skewed data perhaps?

Saturns, Acuras among top targets for car thieves
Associated Press
May. 25, 2004 10:20 AM

DETROIT - The 1995 Saturn SL was the nation's most-stolen vehicle last year based on thefts versus the number of models registered, but hot-selling cars from Asian manufacturers remain popular targets and big sport utility vehicles are gaining ground, a new report shows.

One out of every 200 registered 1995 Saturn SLs was stolen in 2003, placing it ahead of the 1998 Acura Integra and the 1994 Saturn SL as the vehicle thieves targeted most, according to Chicago-based CCC Information Services Inc., an insurance industry tracker of trends in theft and vehicle damage.

CCC changed the way it calculated its list for 2003, combining stolen-vehicle data with vehicle registrations from R.L. Polk & Co. to determine the rate of theft as a percentage of registered models. In the past, it has reported only the brand and model year of those vehicles pilfered the most in a calendar year.

As such, the Toyota Camry and Honda Accord, two of the best-selling vehicles in North America, fell from the top of the list to the middle of the top 25.

Acura, Honda's luxury brand, had six versions of the Integra in the top 10.

"We can't determine the exact reason thieves prefer some vehicles, but our data suggests some cars are stolen for the value of their parts, which may explain why we often see a 'clustering' effect with (specific) models from sequential model years," said Mary Jo Prigge, CCC's president of sales and service.

"Some manufacturers retain the same part-type from model year to model year, so a part from a 1993 model may fit a car manufactured three years later," Prigge said.

CCC, which provides software and information services to insurers and repair shops, receives loss claims from more than 350 property and casualty insurers in North America. The annual report is based on total losses for vehicles that are stolen and not recovered, or stripped to the point of being a total loss.

CCC spokeswoman Jeanene O'Brien said the shift to using theft and vehicle registration information provides more detail to the industry and consumers.

"It's simply a more comprehensive snapshot of vehicle theft," she said. "You're not only looking at what was stolen but what was available to steal."

Vehicles from the mid- to late-1990s were the most intriguing to thieves, CCC said. Vehicles made in 1997 were most susceptible, followed by model years 1996, 1995, 1994 and 1998.

Saturn spokeswoman Sue Holmgren said the brand, a division of General Motors Corp., had no internal data showing high theft rates, but she noted the automaker has made significant changes to its ignition system since 1995. One enhancement is a feature that disables the vehicle's fuel supply if it's started without a key.

Honda spokesman Chuck Schifsky said theft prevention is a goal of every automaker.

"It's important to make sure we continue to put the latest immobilization technology into vehicles," Schifsky said. "But when you're dealing with popular vehicles, they're going to be ones that tend to be stolen."

In the past, Toyota has taken issue with some aspects of CCC's report, saying it's skewed for cars with durability and isn't a representative sampling because it excludes joy rides, among other things.

The average age of a stolen vehicle last year was 6.64 years, the study shows. Acura was the nameplate with the most stolen models, followed by Suzuki, Honda, Mitsubishi and Infiniti.

But larger, newer models such as the Chevrolet Suburban, Cadillac Escalade and GMC Yukon are becoming much more popular theft targets, CCC said.

A report released last summer by the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety said thieves go after the Escalade, the high-priced SUV, at a higher rate than any other vehicle.

The research group, funded by auto insurers, reviewed insurance claims for thefts or break-ins for 2000-2002 model-year vehicles, then compared those claims to the total number of insurance policies for each of those vehicles.

Based on theft claims per 1,000 insured vehicles, five of the top 10 vehicles stolen or broken into were SUVs.

http://www.azcentral.com/news/articles/0525MostStolenVehicles25-ON.html#
 

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I wonder why Honda developed the brand name Acura for your guys market? I mean a Honda is a Honda in Australia, we have different names after the Honda, like the Honda Accord, or the Honda Accord Euro.... but our cars bear the H symbol of Honda still?

Getting back to your topic, our Euro's come with a car alarm as standard, so I don't think it would be a prime target for theft, although nothing would surprise me ;)
 

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as an Integra owner this is depressing as hell
 

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Thorn2004 said:
I wonder why Honda developed the brand name Acura for your guys market? I mean a Honda is a Honda in Australia, we have different names after the Honda, like the Honda Accord, or the Honda Accord Euro.... but our cars bear the H symbol of Honda still?

Getting back to your topic, our Euro's come with a car alarm as standard, so I don't think it would be a prime target for theft, although nothing would surprise me ;)
Back around the early 80's when Asian car companies were looking to challenge the Europeans, Mercedes and BMW. Their market research showed that Americans would be reluctant to spend big dollars for an Asian model premium car.

So they decided to market a new, higher premium line of cars in North America. Honda was the first to jump in and did it with name Acura which is a derivative of Honda (5 letters). Next came Nissan with the Infinity line and Toyota with Lexus. It was one of the worst kept secrets around as almost everyone knew where the cars were coming from.

Around the mid 90's Mazda was about to join in but was suffering financially and pulled out before they could start. Their first model was later sold in the U.S. as the Mazda Millennia.

Anyway, that's how it began. It all seems silly now as most Acura owners in North America are forever trying to make their cars look like the Honda equivalents from Europe and I suspect some European owners are trying to turn their Hondas into Acuras?
 

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Joker said:
I agree, and that is the main reason why I sold my ITR :(
Hey, on the positive side this is the first year I haven't seen an Accord on the list? :festive:
 

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Joker said:
I agree, and that is the main reason why I sold my ITR :(
yeah i bet. mines just an ls and I'm paranoid about leaving it out for the week while my driveways repaired. Every other :( damn day another stolen itr thread pops up on ht
 

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hip said:
Back around the early 80's when Asian car companies were looking to challenge the Europeans, Mercedes and BMW. Their market research showed that Americans would be reluctant to spend big dollars for an Asian model premium car.

So they decided to market a new, higher premium line of cars in North America. Honda was the first to jump in and did it with name Acura which is a derivative of Honda (5 letters). Next came Nissan with the Infinity line and Toyota with Lexus. It was one of the worst kept secrets around as almost everyone knew where the cars were coming from.

Around the mid 90's Mazda was about to join in but was suffering financially and pulled out before they could start. Their first model was later sold in the U.S. as the Mazda Millennia.

Anyway, that's how it began. It all seems silly now as most Acura owners in North America are forever trying to make their cars look like the Honda equivalents from Europe and I suspect some European owners are trying to turn their Hondas into Acuras?
Thanks for the info, now it all makes sense :) I guess marketing wise, they thaught it was a good idea at the time, although like you said, all the Acura owners would know it was a Honda produced car!
 

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hip said:
.....Anyway, that's how it began. It all seems silly now as most Acura owners in North America are forever trying to make their cars look like the Honda equivalents from Europe and I suspect some European owners are trying to turn their Hondas into Acuras?
I know Hip's sort of kidding (at least a little bit), but..... I don't think most Acura owners here are doing that, or think anything like that. A fair number of reverse-chic people on these TSX sites do, but even on these sites it's a minority, and in "the real world" I doubt that more than a few per cent of Acura people feel that way.

And I certainly don't. I think the whole "Acura" thing was a good idea. Honda might have mismanaged it in a lot of ways over the years, and I think they did. But even so, it's been a good thing.

For me, both the Honda pedigree AND the fact that these cars are "better than Hondas" were important in making me an Acura buyer in the first place. It was very early on in Acura's history, and so there was no track record. That the cars were "really" Hondas was a big plus to me, in terms of trust and expected reliability. And the fact that there were differences -- positive differences -- was also important. The "reverse-chic" people like to say that the differences are minimal or nonexistent. That's subjective, and in most instances it's wrong, unless you have a high threshold for how big a difference has to be in order for you to notice it.

Even when the Acura car has an "equivalent" Honda elsewhere in the world, it's my understanding that there still have always been differences. It is most definitely the case with regard to the Euro Accord and the TSX, although my impression about the Euro Accord is that I'd be happy to have that car if there were no TSX.
 

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Hmmmmm. Well, I was wondering if leaving my TSX parked on the "wrong side of town" would be easier than just selling it. ;) Maybe not.

NEWS RELEASE
August 21, 2003

CADILLAC ESCALADE SUV IS TOP THEFT TARGET &
HAS WORST OVERALL INSURANCE THEFT LOSSES


ARLINGTON, VA -- The Cadillac Escalade SUV has the most frequent theft claims among 2000-02 model passenger vehicles. Its theft claim frequency is about four times the average for all vehicles.

These are the latest insurance theft loss results published by the Highway Loss Data Institute (HLDI), an affiliate of the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety.

"The Escalade has both the highest theft claim frequency and the worst overall theft losses -- 10 times the average for all vehicles -- indicating it's a top target for thieves,"says Kim Hazelbaker, HLDI senior vice president. "The Escalade's theft losses are the highest even though it's equipped with a standard antitheft ignition immobilizer. These immobilizers have reduced thefts of other vehicles, but we don't know why they don't seem to be effective for the Escalade."

The vehicle that topped last year's list, the Integra, was redesigned in 2002 and renamed the RSX. So far the RSX doesn't have the same high rate of theft claims as the Integra.

"Theft investigators believe the old Acura Integra was targeted by car thieves for its parts, including the engine, which then were sold to people who modify Honda Civics,"Hazelbaker says. "These same components also are interchangeable between the RSX and the new Civic. We'll have to wait and see whether the RSX becomes a target."

CLICK FOR MORE
 

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I'm not concerned about leaving my '96 GS-R parked on the street. I've got an alarm system on it with an immobilizer, so that will take care of the "common" thief. Of course, if they REALLY want to steal it, there's not much that'll stop them... isn't that why we get insurance?

Anyway, if they steal it, then I can start shopping for a new car! :)

I wonder why the Saturn SL is so popular. I can understand the Integra, with the import tuner trend going on, but why a measley Saturn?
 

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larchmont said:
Interchangeable, eh? :mad:
I think that quote is a bit misleading. I think they mean that the Integra and previous Civic had interchangeable parts, as well as the RSX and current Civic.

I don't think that any Integra parts are interchangeable with RSX parts.
 

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the rsx will be up there soon. k series swaps are becoming common. Including tsx, accords and crvs engines....
 

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sjlee said:
I wonder why the Saturn SL is so popular. I can understand the Integra, with the import tuner trend going on, but why a measley Saturn?
That is a good question. As a former owner of a measly Saturn SL (wife had one also, 1995 model to be exact), I can say that they are probably not stolen on their merits. BUT GM did take 12 years to redesign them, so many parts are probably interchangeable over that entire timeline. So since are relatively high numbers of them still on the road, it makes sense to me to steal them for illigitimately sold parts.
 
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