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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So now time for a discussion about the problem I had on Saturday's canyon run with my brakes. Mods are as follow.

*Pretty sure that its Generic Brand Rotors, resurfaced <100miles ago.
*SS Lines
*Hawk HP+ Pads
*Amsoil Fluid.

The brakes would feel perfect for the first 6-8mins, then would start overheating on the canyons. Especially after Liliac, when I stopped. The whole time, I felt 0% fade, and coming to full stop they just gave out. And smoked like CRAZY.

After the second run, I felt fade/overheating by the last 10-15corners, and was smoking when we stopped.

Driving style was fairly agressive yet I still engine braked as much as possible.

The bottleneck could be the cheap rotors not cooling down soon? May be?
Will ducts help a bit more, which im surely doing?

Btw never had this problem before the brake upgrade, but before this I never had good braking power either so I think I need to upgrade the rotors now?

Coming from a S2k, and CM7 Accord, feels good to add the TSX to the stable. :)
 

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The only thing I can think of is did you bed your pads in before the run? Did you drag the brakes while on the run? Canyon runs are naturally hard on brakes.
 

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racingbrake are the best rotors out there imo
 

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+1 on racingbrake, i got the UP slotted's all around with ET500 pads, shits awesome

you may just be burning off the new pads

mine smoked like hell for the first few days, now they are great
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Upon question of bedding them in before the run. Yes, I did the procedure and had about 50-60miles on them before the run.

Racing brake rotors? hmmm gotta look those up now.

And right now, im set on getting EBC Slotted and Dimpled rotors? does that sound good enough. And to back up my choice, I have a friend who has them on his Ap2 s2000 with 20k miles. Had done like 4-6 track days on them with Carbotech pads, and lots of AutoCross and canyon runs.

Now whats the take on drilled very slotted rotors? Drileld seems to be more prone to cracking etc, but again I think combined with some cooling ducts it should work great.

Any ideas?
 

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Bre, i tell you, my RB brakes was naturally on fire , we had a honda meeteng and guys tried to press all the shit out of my car after i finished my tune ) We run really hard, up to 100-120 mph , they were great in stopping, after 3-4 hard stops they smoked and after few more guys said i have flames on em ! They faded a lil but stopped car just fine. I extinguished em, made a run to cool and they were just fine. I boiled my brake fluid on those testings and pedal degraded but i bleeded em and everything turned back again. RB two piece FTW )
 

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Its a problem with any metallic brake, they have a thermal threshold, some higher than others. Most likely you are getting fade from your rotors if they are stock. The stock ones are terrible, theyll stop you from 100 once....lol.

The question on whether drilled and slotted or just drilled etc. is not something I can comment on other than on both my cars I have drilled and slotted and they are fantastic. 100s of times better on my tsx.

Just get some high quality raceish spec rotors and youll see a huge difference, Id also recommend getting a full blown set of race pads for when you do those runs and than after you can switch to more streetable pads. GL!
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
^^thanks buddy. And I totally agree with you. Before my first track day, I'll surely be getting a set of EBC slotted and dimpled ones. Any na things about those?

And about having a full blown race set would t work for me since I dot do many track days yet I go for runs once a week at least. I don't have a garage either do I can e doing pad swaps every Friday night in my condos parking spot lol. And even if I had one, I would e too lazy.

That's why Ichoae the HP+ for being track ready-ish that can be used on the streets
 

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I race on road courses with my various hondas and am also a driving instructor with several clubs. Here's what I'd recommend based on experience:

no streetable pad will give top end track performance. You really need a 2nd set of pads (and ideally rotors) dedicated to this use. I use Hawk Blues on track, but they are not a street pad. Any of the higher end hawk pads will work fine, but Blues are probably the easiest to come by. (They also make 9012, HT-10, etc.). Porterfield is a another good choice.

Ducting will help. This helped quite a bit on my track cars.

I'd say forget slots/drilled/dimpled. Those make no positive difference in braking performance, and rotors are not your weak link. Less material = less heat sink, so drilled/slotted/dimpled is generally just for looks on any type of street car.

Bigger rotors and calipers (=more mass to heat sink) will help. Using the brakes less is really probably the best plan. don't do engine braking, just work on driving in such a manner that you don't need to be constantly using the brakes. You can use the car sliding to scrub speed (At least on the track, this is a good technique when brakes are a limiting factor), not sure if that's viable in canyon runs.

Using them when needed, more intensely for a short period of time, is easier than using them less intensely for a longer period of time.

Quality fluid, well bled is a must (ATE super blue in my case).

Given those things you should have no problem braking. My track cars can stand up to an hour or more of sustained lapping at full chat, on any track I've been to, with no brake issues. (2600lb Prelude for example, NSX calipers, Legend rotors, Hawk blues, ducting, stainless lines, ATE fluid).

hope that helps
-Ed
 

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I race on road courses with my various hondas and am also a driving instructor with several clubs. Here's what I'd recommend based on experience:

no streetable pad will give top end track performance. You really need a 2nd set of pads (and ideally rotors) dedicated to this use. I use Hawk Blues on track, but they are not a street pad. Any of the higher end hawk pads will work fine, but Blues are probably the easiest to come by. (They also make 9012, HT-10, etc.). Porterfield is a another good choice.

Ducting will help. This helped quite a bit on my track cars.

I'd say forget slots/drilled/dimpled. Those make no positive difference in braking performance, and rotors are not your weak link. Less material = less heat sink, so drilled/slotted/dimpled is generally just for looks on any type of street car.

Bigger rotors and calipers (=more mass to heat sink) will help. Using the brakes less is really probably the best plan. don't do engine braking, just work on driving in such a manner that you don't need to be constantly using the brakes. You can use the car sliding to scrub speed (At least on the track, this is a good technique when brakes are a limiting factor), not sure if that's viable in canyon runs.

Using them when needed, more intensely for a short period of time, is easier than using them less intensely for a longer period of time.

Quality fluid, well bled is a must (ATE super blue in my case).

Given those things you should have no problem braking. My track cars can stand up to an hour or more of sustained lapping at full chat, on any track I've been to, with no brake issues. (2600lb Prelude for example, NSX calipers, Legend rotors, Hawk blues, ducting, stainless lines, ATE fluid).

hope that helps
-Ed
Well said Ed! The ducting is something I want to do this summer.
 

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Thanks guys, glad to share if it's useful.

one thing I forgot when talking about ducting - I removed the splash shields on my front brakes on my track cars. It allows more airflow to the rotor area, with the ducting. I use approx 2" ducting from home depot, it was wire-reinforced silicone accordian-style tubing designed for in-home vacuum cleaner systems (like a whole-house vac, apparently.) Cheap and it held up well. Racer Parts Wholesale sells (or sold) NACA ducts you can use as a front-end for the ducting, to gather more air. Or just the hose stuck into the airflow through the grille (out the foglight area?) will work fine.

For ducting you want to direct the air to the center of the rotor as much as possible. Ideally, directly into the center of the rotor so the airflow gets forced through the vanes would be ideal. Impossible on our cars of course since they are FWD, but that would be the ideal setup if doable.

-Ed
 

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Carbotech XP8's or Cobalt 3's 06 Compound Performance Friction Pads also work well.
 

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I use Hawk street pads in my civic and in my gf's tsx and never had any issues with them. Noise and dust is pretty much the same as stock. If you use race pads on a daily drive car you will have issues.
 
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