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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Greetings
Though there are plenty of posts on this topic, most are interested in lowering, adjustments for tracking, and the like. My requirements are not so sophisticated. The last 3 years of NJ winters has created a sea of potholes that get repaired and repaired and repaired. My 2012 TSX has 130K miles on the ODO and with proper maintenance since new, it's been an excellent car. But my struts are shot.
I think the best choice seem so be the KYB struts, and their is a longtime seller of complete kits which look like a good choice. I THINK I posted a link to the images below (there are actually 2 kits and I can’t tell the difference. I am also trying to determine if I need to purchase the Front Mount (as in the picture) of that can be reused about removing the strut from the spring assembly.




Thank you in advance
John from Jersey
 

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the front mount can be reused but i do not recommend KYB struts for the tsx.
i was in a similar situation as you last summer and i chose to go with KYB struts. the ride quality of these is the same if not worse than stock struts that are blown. ever since i put them on, my car is really bouncy and handles horribly. i was actually planning on replacing these KYB struts with new OEM struts soon. just letting you know so you dont make the same mistake i did
 

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Replacing struts used to be a dangerous job for a DIYer. You had to compress the spring and remove the strut while praying the spring wouldn’t let go and take out an eye or a limb. Plus, removing the rusty nut at the top of the strut could turn into a nightmare if the internal hex stripped out. But these days you can buy a complete strut assembly that eliminates the strut/spring/mount disassembly process. These assemblies allow you to replace both of your front struts yourself in less than two hours. You’ll have to get an alignment done afterward (about $100), but you’ll still save about $300 by doing the job yourself. You’ll need rust penetrant, wrenches, a pin punch or large screwdriver, and a thin piece of plywood. You may need to buy a few large sockets and a breaker bar. Here are the steps.
 

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With konis you can usually undo the top nut lift the car and unbolt the rest, or remove the whole strut, point it in a safe direction and undo the top nut, then using a jack compress it all back together once the bottom bolts are lovely in place, then secure the top nut.

You can do factory shocks like this but the force is much higher in the factory height perches.

Konis are the best choice for just shocks or suspension techniques st for not that much more for adjustable height.
 

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Replacing struts used to be a dangerous job for a DIYer. You had to compress the spring and remove the strut while praying the spring wouldn’t let go and take out an eye or a limb. Plus, removing the rusty nut at the top of the strut could turn into a nightmare if the internal hex stripped out. But these days you can buy a complete strut assembly that eliminates the strut/spring/mount disassembly process. These assemblies allow you to replace both of your front struts yourself in less than two hours. You’ll have to get an alignment done afterward (about $100), but you’ll still save about $300 by doing the job yourself. You’ll need rust penetrant, wrenches, a pin punch or large screwdriver, and a thin piece of plywood. You may need to buy a few large sockets and a breaker bar. Here are the steps.
dude I still don't understand what your deal is
 
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