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Discussion Starter #1
CAR: 2008, Acura TSX, Engine: 2.4L, 2354 CC, 117k miles

So when I turn on the AC/Heater a chirping sound comes from the Belt Tensioner and the Belt Tensioner assembly is shaking/moving.

Do you think I should only change the pulley or the entire belt tensioner assembly?

Anyone know what the torque specs are for both the Assembly and Pulley?

Thanks!
 

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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)

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I changed mine three times, never looked up the torque specs. Just remember you tightening bolts into aluminum. Don’t know the oe brand. The parts stores carry two basic types, only one of which will be built like the original one. Buy the one that looks the one in your car. The non oe looking one uses a different size bolt on the pulley and has a weaker spring that might start bouncing soon after installation. Not sure about that Amazon tensioner. This is the one I installed last : https://www.oreillyauto.com/detail/...4348132/2005/acura/tsx?q=Belt+tensioner&pos=0
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Just called Continental 888-899-6354 for the Continental Part #49413 and the person answering told me something about the pulley being steel and not aluminum...if that's true I'll go with that.

I'm guessing the OEM for this belt tensioner is Denso, but unsure...
 

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The body of the tensioner and the engine block in your car are made of aluminum. The pulley is made of steel and is secured to the aluminum idler arm with a steel bolt and captive steel nut.
 

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Typically I'm a stickler for respecting bolt torque values but in the instance of the idler pulley the same 32 ft/lbs should work great. I'm sure buried deep in the workshop manual that value is listed but I don't have it right at hand.

I would suggest using a bit of anti-seize on the bolt threads for both the tensioner and idler---should it ever be necessary to replace them again they'll remove easily.
 

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Careful with the anti-seize, I use it for almost everything but it will tend to reduce the torque value required to obtain a certain amount of tension on the bolt... so it's easier to apply too much tension which could stretch the bolt or strip the threads. So take care, don't torque it even a hair over spec.

For larger bolts with higher torque specs in things like engine blocks, crankshafts, etc I don't use ant-seize unless the manual says to.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
So what you're saying is skip the anti-seize; and I'm assuming also skip the loctite (given what Trinder said).
And Just straight up tighten the pulley nut to 41 ft/lb's - which seems like that will shear it right off. But I respect the numbers if the manual states it...thanks

Hopefully it'll be an ez installation. I got this kind but the arrows are not labeled on it unfortunately: Amazon.com: Continental 49413 Accu-Drive Tensioner Assembly: Automotive

Careful with the anti-seize, I use it for almost everything but it will tend to reduce the torque value required to obtain a certain amount of tension on the bolt... so it's easier to apply too much tension which could stretch the bolt or strip the threads. So take care, don't torque it even a hair over spec.

For larger bolts with higher torque specs in things like engine blocks, crankshafts, etc I don't use ant-seize unless the manual says to.
 

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You kind of have to balance the risk of over-torquing vs. the hassle of the bolt being stuck next time. I do use it on most smaller bolts, just carefully. A clean, wire brushed bolt is almost as good as anti-seize unless it's something that's going to get hot or corroded (brakes, suspension).

It's big bolts/stud on major engine parts or cases where you probably want to skip the anti-seize... use very clean or new bolts. Obvious exception is if the manual says to use it, then the torque value accounts for that. Consequences of screwing up are costly.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
I understand, and perhaps in the future I'll invest in one of those manuals depending on price....:rolleyes:
Now I purchased the Continental belt-tensioner but since it doesn't have the arrow on it, I'm having second thoughts about returning it and purchasing an OEM brand...(Im starting to think that a belt-tensioner is one of those devices that needs to be an OEM device since it keeps the drive-belt components together) I found this one on Amazon: Amazon.com: Genuine Honda 31170-PNA-023 Auto Tensioner Assembly: Automotive
 

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I used an aftermaket belt tensioner without lines/marks on it. I just marked lines on it prior to installation. After installation I made another reference line that matched the new position of the line that moved(pulley-side). So I had one side (pulley-side) with a line (arrow) and two lines on the opposite end. Then I just observed over time the progress. I referenced how much movement was acceptable by making another line that was the same distance of allowable movement as the oem tensioner. It worked well. Just use a marker and a metal scribe to make the lines in case the marked line wears away. This should also be done with a new belt.
 
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