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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello guys,

I finally persuaded another friend of mine to buy the TSX, he has a nice experience buying it until he talked to the dealer after the agreement are signed that he wanted them to give him a wheellock as a gift (I guess the price of $40-$70), I don't know the details.

The salesman said that he wanted to think about it over the weekend, then he just called my friend and said that he can only sell it to my friend for $80. My friend is furious thinking he could get that taken care of as gift after paying around $28500 for the car.

He asked me if he can get out of that deal and buy the car somewhere else ? (different dealer)

I have no idea, so I in turn ask the experts in here....

Thanks for any idea or comments :)
 

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I had a $500 deposit down on the TL, and found what I wanted at another dealer.
I called the first dealer, asked for it back, and within a week it was credited back to my account :thumbsup:
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Joker said:
I had a $500 deposit down on the TL, and found what I wanted at another dealer.
I called the first dealer, asked for it back, and within a week it was credited back to my account :thumbsup:
Thanks Joker,

You don't need to tell them any reason ? Just tell them that you want to have
your deposit back and do the deal elsewhere ?
 

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No you don't. But in his case, I'd tell them. They should try everything in their power to make him happy. If they don't, I'd also take my money to a dealer who is willing to work with me. :thumbsup:
Joker - who thinks a dealer would be crazy to give up a sale over $80
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Joker said:
No you don't. But in his case, I'd tell them. They should try everything in their power to make him happy. If they don't, I'd also take my money to a dealer who is willing to work with me. :thumbsup:
Joker - who thinks a dealer would be crazy to give up a sale over $80
Thanks Joker....actually my friend thinks he get a great deal. He also is afraid of losing the deal over $80. (Yes, he just called me, it is $80). Now, the whole thing is hinged on who blink first.

(My friend said that he doesn't think that $80 is a big deal also, but now that the attitude of the dealer has changed 180% since the deal was made. My friend said that it's the matter of pride and respect now instead of $$$) oh mine !!
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
larchmont said:
I believe that it most if not all states, by law you can get back your deposit (and get out of the deal) at any time before you actually get the car, regardless of reason.
Hellow larchmont,

Yeah. I warn him that he could lose his great deal, if he insisted on taking his deposit and run. However, he said that it's not the $80 anymore, it's the way they treat him after he bought the car on 5 pm last Sat. Only 2 days and the whole attitude has changed on him.
 

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Tell your friend to stick to his guns :thumbsup:
BTW, did he get his deal in writing? If so, it will be very easy to get another dealer to match, or even beat it. :nod:
Joker - who hates how dealer's try to make you think that you will only get that deal from them ;)
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Joker said:
Tell your friend to stick to his guns :thumbsup:
BTW, did he get his deal in writing? If so, it will be very easy to get another dealer to match, or even beat it. :nod:
Joker - who hates how dealer's try to make you think that you will only get that deal from them ;)
He has the whole receipt. Price, deposits, everything.
However, unwittingly, he paid $4500 deposits. That's a whole lot of money.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
All set now !!! Thanks guys !

The sales manager talked to my friend. He said he could give him the $80 wheel lock in exchange of him filing out the car sales survey by putting excellent in every category. Done deal !! :)
 

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should've made the dealership throw something else in there for the hassle :D

wheels locks are cheap to the dealerships...seems like my dealership gives out a set for every car they sell... All the ones in the showroom has wheel locks on them, but not listed on the accesories list on the window...
 

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Here is an interesting piece of the reasoning behind that survey (from Edmunds).

Very Pleased, Somewhat Pleased, Not Pleased: The Surprising Importance of "C.S.I." Surveys
By Mike Hudson

You're negotiating for a car when the salesman says he'll drop the price in exchange for "high fives" on a survey you'll be given about his performance. What does he mean by this and what should you do?

The answer is: see what else he'll give you, of course. But keep in mind that the survey he's referring to is about customer satisfaction and your responses mean the world to your salesman and the dealership.

Soon after a person buys a car, they'll get a letter or phone call from a company hired by the manufacturer asking them how they would rate their experience with the dealership. And surprisingly to most consumers, the automakers care deeply about how you feel.

From increased profits to dibs on hot new cars from the car companies to getting the green light to expand, dealerships have become beholden to what their customers say about them. Knowing this can win you a surprising amount of leverage in the showroom.


Competition Creates the Survey

Until well into the 1980s, customers were used to rough handling at the car dealership. Many folks considered the jostling and pressure to be an unavoidable part of buying a new car.

But with the advent of Toyota, Honda and other import-brand dealerships, all that changed. Suddenly, Americans had salespeople bending over backwards for their business as the Japanese brands battled to get a foothold in the North American automotive market.

With the additional competition, the behavior of the dealerships was crucial to the success of the companies. So the Consumer Satisfaction Survey was born. These scores are tabulated, compared with other dealers in your city or region and then calculated into a Consumer Satisfaction Index, or "CSI" as dealers refer to it.

From humble beginnings, these surveys have become a big part of the buying experience and an important tool for carmakers. More than a dozen companies work for the manufacturers collecting data from mailings and phone calls about buyers' experiences at the dealership.


All Good Car Dealers Go to Heaven

The head honchos at the automakers like to see high scores from their dealerships and are willing to back that up with a series of rewards and punishments for those that succeed or fail to live up to expectations.

The most widely used "carrot" for well-reviewed dealerships is product. Simply put, if you do well on your CSI scores, then you'll get hot-selling models. If you don't, you'll only get your stock from what the other dealers have picked over.

"It's very important to the dealership to get new products," said Carlos Zelaya, sales manager at Ed Butts Ford, a member of Ford's top-performing "Blue Oval" dealership program in La Puente, Calif. "With the 2005 Mustang, we're going to be getting four. There are a lot of dealerships that won't be getting any."

In the past, top-performing dealerships have also gotten bigger "holdback" payments from the manufacturers. "Holdback" is a percentage of the price of a vehicle that the manufacturer rebates to a dealer after the car is sold. Ford will be cutting this part of its CSI incentive program, dealers say.


You've Got the Power

While most dealerships won't admit it, you can often use the importance of these surveys to your advantage. One editor at Edmunds.com reported that she was directly offered a few hundred dollars discount from her purchase price if she promised a good response to the survey. While the ploy likely won't work all the time, the threat of a bad survey is yet another arrow in the buyer's quiver when testing dealers' bottom-line offers.

At the very least, dealers will often give you your first full tank of gas, a car wash or some better floor mats to help sweeten your experience and boost their scores on the surveys.


Surveys Aren't Perfect

To be fair, dealers have long complained to manufacturers that the surveys aren't fair. Some customers will give a dealership a poor review after having a seemingly pleasant experience. Others refuse to call any experience "Excellent," preferring to mark "Good" for all categories to mean they were satisfied. But, by the way some of the companies score these surveys, "Good" is often counted as a failure on the dealership's part.

"It doesn't make any sense to put this much importance on them because you can never figure out what people are going to say," said one general manager of a Toyota dealership in Missouri. "It's been a big issue for the dealers trying to get these things changed because customer experiences and their responses don't match up."

In fact, some dealerships are being driven to great lengths to improve their scores. Some will offer to have you come back to the dealership to fill out the survey, or send flowers to your home imploring you to give them a top rating.

Others will go to unethical measures to prevent your responses from being heard. An editor at Edmunds.com was displeased with a repair experience at a Los Angeles-area Chrysler dealership and loudly complained during a survey. But when he later returned the car for a subsequent service appointment, he noticed his phone number and address had been altered, making it impossible to contact him for another survey.


Speak Your Mind

While CSI surveys create headaches for dealers, remember that it's only because your opinion is very important to manufacturers. So don't be afraid to make your displeasure known during the buying process. It can often work to your advantage by making the dealership work harder to please you. On the other hand, after the deal is done, if you are pleased, be sure to give the dealer credit in the survey. But if you're not, don't hesitate to let them have it, knowing full well that your opinion counts heavily and your voice will be heard.



WOULD ANYONE CARE TO SHARE AN EXPERIENCE WHERE THEY GAVE THE DEALERSHIP BAD MARKS ON THE SURVEY and why?
 
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