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Discussion Starter #1
I just got my first car, a 2005 PWP Tsx and i have never driven manual before.
Would it be damaging to my car if i practiced on it?

I had my friend teach me how to drive it for about an hour in the parking lot. I havnt stalled much, but while starting from 0, the car car is jerky, and shakes.
should i stop practicing on it? I dont wanna be doing extensive damaging my car.
 

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From Nissan to Honda
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My 06 is my first 6MT car, its a very easy car to learn on. Honda gearboxes are smooth, and the clutch is very forgiving. I stalled a few times too but eventually got the hang of the engagement point.

Now I feel like the clutch is way too soft lol.

Once you get used to it if slight jerkiness still remains it could just be ecu delay from the DBW system that's on these cars. To compensate for this, I just keep on the throttle partially when I clutch in. Its a slight delay/lag.

If that last part didn't make sense to you yet, it will after a few weeks.

Enjoy!

BTW, great choice on a first car! You'll love it :)
 

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It's true - Honda gearboxes are smooth. I first learned stick shift on my dads old 6G Civic and within a few days I stopped stalling altogether and even started basic rev matching. And it's not like you haven't driven manual ever before, the 1 hour of practice you've had is good enough to understand the concept. Driving is a learning experience anyways.
 

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If it starts to smell like burning rubberbands, you're doing it wrong. Otherwise you'll be fine.
 

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, Chief SuperModerator, Info Center / Car Care & D
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For a first timer, you will stall, and you will smell burning clutch. The best advice that I got when I first started out was to gas first, then release the clutch slowly. After someone told me that method, I never stalled again. Sure, it might burn the clutch a bit more, but it's better than stalling.
 

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Scientisting since 2005
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keep things slow, dont bring your rpms up too high.... easy into the clutch and let it out smooth.... after a week you will naturally gain more confidence to speed up the whole process.... within a month or two you wont even notice that your shifting, it all comes natural, you feel/hear the rpms and it just all clicks...
 

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you have to learn how to drive the car at some point so you might as well learn on your own car. Stalling is all part of the process. you will be fine.. good luck
 

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Just learn on your TSX since that what you will be driving. Each make and model has its quirks. My 2004 TSX is my first manual car, but I did learn on an old Chevy pickup truck (1976 3 speed).

Good luck! Just remember to be patient.
 

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I am sure you're be fine. I learned it on my friends Integra and it wasn't hard at all. Overtime and practice you will become a pro! Have fun
 

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DBW makes this car a bitch to drive smooth.

And it gets worse in the summer time. Turn on the AC? The engagement point changes.
:banghead:
 

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(showing my age)....
I learned to drive stick on my first new car -- an '83 Firebird SE.
My brother-in-law helped me a bit before I took delivery driving around his neighborhood in an old Chevy Chevette. Other than that, I basically "learned" on the Firebird, and there were no issues.

The best advice I got was "lots of gas, and easy on the clutch".*
But don't over-do the gas... It's kind of a knack, like riding a bike, but fairly easy to get the hang of.

A bigger concern than stalling is rolling back into someone if stopped on a hill.

Find a fairly empty parking garage and practice starting from a dead stop on a backward slope. It's lots easier to get the hang of it when you're not worried about the car behind you, or them getting impatient while you figure it out. :)

*Lots of gas and easy on the clutch isn't good as a general rule.... you'll tend to wear the clutch out faster, but for the period you're learning to do it, it should be fine. Eventually you'll get a feel for how much gas is "enough" and how much faster you can release the clutch without stalling or making the car lurch forward.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Thanks for all your reply's. I'm finally getting it insured in a few days, and ill be hitting the real roads for some practice.
I was practicing at night uninsured with my friend cause i couldn't handle the temptations of just leaving the car in my garage. :squint:
 

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It's important to learn to rev match on downshifts (or double clutching.) That will reduce wear on your synchros and gears.

Also, two more quick tips:

1. When shifting from a gear to reverse, let it sit in neutral for a second or two. That will prevent grinding.

2. When starting from a stop and moving from neutral to first, drop quickly into 2nd gear then go into 1st. This also prevents wear.

3. At stop lights, stay in neutral as much as possible, not with the clutch pressed and gear in first.

4. Learn the friction point when the clutch engages and then start giving gas.
 

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, Chief SuperModerator, Info Center / Car Care & D
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2. When starting from a stop and moving from neutral to first, drop quickly into 2nd gear then go into 1st. This also prevents wear.
I actually never heard and seen anyone do this before. Does it really what kind of wear is this preventing?
 
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