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Discussion Starter #1
I did a search and found a thread but it didn't really address my problem. It just asked for reasons why he should choose a coilover instead of a shock/spring set-up.

The TSX is my daily commuter with occasional backroad twisty usage :). Because of this I don't want a large drop (looking at 1.5 maybe 2). Also keep in mind as of now I live in Pennsylvania (I'll get to why that is important in a bit).

Now the issue....

shock/spring combo:
I want a suspension set up but I'm not the type of person to fiddle around with adjustability. I was thinking of a shock/spring combo but I don't know what shocks works best with what springs. There doesn't seem to be too many people on this forum that use a shock/spring setup or have any in depth reviews for me to read. So if you can, suggest some to me. One thing I was worried about is optimal shock/spring pairing. Is there such a thing? If I was to go this route, I was thinking about going with progressive springs with shocks (thinking of using the Neuspeed Super Cup Kit from heeltoe). Are the Neuspeed Super Cup Kit shocks rebuildable? That would be a big plus. Can you use progressive springs with coilovers? Are there negative side effects? I'm also trying to weigh costs. I'm not trying to spend too much money but I also want decent quality (I'm a post college student paying back loans and planning to go back to school in a bit). Some spring/shock combos I was looking at cost just as much if not more than some coilover options I was looking at (Really interested in the HT-Spec type 1 since they were developed with the TSX in mind and is at a really attractive price).

Coilover thoughts:
So like i said, I'm really interested in the HT-Spec type 1s and I was talking to my friend (we are big automotive enthusiasts and love learning/debating on everything cars. It's actually how we became friends, back on topic...) and he brought up the point about how it is very probable that the threads on the coilovers may become unusable and shocks may be prone to damage(rust, etc.) after time through the changing road conditions (rain/snow/salt). This is making me rethink my coilover option cause it sounds possible.

So please lend me your advice on this issue as well as suggestions for a shock/spring combo. Looking for a sporty suspension with daily driven forgiveness. Sorry for the many questions.
 

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I'd hit up 1Tsxer on this forum. He switched from koni yellows + springs (maybe the neuspeed kit) to the buddy club N+ coilovers so he can tell you his experience on each. I have the buddyclub N+ coilovers as well and I love them. I rarely adjust them but I do like having the option to incase my needs change. Not sure how the weather is like where you live but snow and salt would be a concern with both spring/shot and coilover setups. I've read that some users tape up the threads to protect it from the salt when it snows. Maybe someone from a snowy are can chime in on it.

In terms of pricing, a good set of shocks and springs will run you about as much as a good set of coilovers. The buddyclub's are not repairable/serviceable but all the parts can be replaced with new ones. I went with the coilovers cause I wanted something that worked and was adjustable. If I tracked my car, I think koni's and springs would have been the way to go. Hope that helps.
 

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i had springs and struts on my last car and i hated them. I now have coils on my tsx and its the best thing i ever bought. they wont rust because its aluminium, and they normally have a zinc coating so it wont corrode (yes theres a difference). the worst that happens is the threads get a little dirty but thats nothing a hose, wd40, and a air compressor cant fix:) Ive had mine on for almost a year and ive adjusted them many times with no problem.

As long as you rinse the car off after a nasty storm to get ride of the salt youll never have a problem
 

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Coilover thoughts:
So like i said, I'm really interested in the HT-Spec type 1s and I was talking to my friend (we are big automotive enthusiasts and love learning/debating on everything cars. It's actually how we became friends, back on topic...) and he brought up the point about how it is very probable that the threads on the coilovers may become unusable and shocks may be prone to damage(rust, etc.) after time through the changing road conditions (rain/snow/salt). This is making me rethink my coilover option cause it sounds possible.
As mentioned by the posters above, as long as you take steps to maintain the coilovers, you should be fine. You mentioned, though, that you are the kind of person that doesn't fiddle with adjust-ability. Unless you're someone who wants to raise and lower the car depending on the season (ie: snow), you probably won't make any adjustments once you find the perfect height. The beauty of coilovers is that you can set the car at the exact height that you want (rather than having to decide on springs that drop 1" or 2", or springs that don't drop the same amount at all 4 corners). Once you set the height, you probably won't ever touch it again unless you buy rims or tires of a different size (since they might increase/decrease the gap).

I think you should continue saving and only mod your suspension when you can afford to do so correctly. I don't mind when people try to save money on other things, but suspensions have a role in keeping your car on the road.

As you mentioned, not too many people here choose springs, but there are quite a few of them out there. I, too, was wary about the daily-driving experience of coilovers. Coilovers have come a long way and can be just as comfortable as using springs.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks for the reply guys. If there are people in snowy climates and have had coilovers for a couple seasons please chime in!
 

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Thanks for the reply guys. If there are people in snowy climates and have had coilovers for a couple seasons please chime in!
Im in NY and i actually just raised the car up a little more a few days ago with no problem. My buddy slams his car and than lifts it all the way up for the winter every year hes had the same coils for 3 years.

I promise you if you just take a hose every few weeks during the winter, stick your arm behind the wheel and spray everything down youll be fine:)

im not trying to push you in any direction but if your thinking that there gonna lock up on you, as long as you spray them down theyll be good!
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Im in NY and i actually just raised the car up a little more a few days ago with no problem. My buddy slams his car and than lifts it all the way up for the winter every year hes had the same coils for 3 years.

I promise you if you just take a hose every few weeks during the winter, stick your arm behind the wheel and spray everything down youll be fine:)

im not trying to push you in any direction but if your thinking that there gonna lock up on you, as long as you spray them down theyll be good!
Don't worry about it, I appreciate your comments. This brings up another thought I forgot to mention. I also talked to my friend about this and he said that if I had my car lowered(say ~1.5) and had an alignment at that height and raised it for the winter, would I need to re-align the car for the new height? He said that by raising it, it would need to be re-aligned because of not just camber but toe may be messed up. And if this is the case, then there isn't any point to messing with the ride height during changing seasons if I need to get an alignment twice a year.
 

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Don't worry about it, I appreciate your comments. This brings up another thought I forgot to mention. I also talked to my friend about this and he said that if I had my car lowered(say ~1.5) and had an alignment at that height and raised it for the winter, would I need to re-align the car for the new height? He said that by raising it, it would need to be re-aligned because of not just camber but toe may be messed up. And if this is the case, then there isn't any point to messing with the ride height during changing seasons if I need to get an alignment twice a year.
Yes you will need an alignment every time you adjust the ride height. I'd research and invest in an alignment place that sells unlimited lifetime alignments (I go to Firestone). Getting an alignment twice a year is reasonable but adds up if you spend 50-100 bucks per alignment.
 

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as said in a lot of other threads, you just need to be diligent about cleaning your coils. if you're meticulous you won't run into issues. if you don't think you want to take the time to make sure you keep 'em clean, maybe go a different route. coils are best though.
 

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Sorry to thread-jack, but Tekneek how did you get the Firestone lifetime alignment. I went to mine and they said it's company policy that they won't be able to offer that because of all the relocation, consumer benefit crap. I know it's all BS but did you have trouble with them?
 

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Sorry to thread-jack, but Tekneek how did you get the Firestone lifetime alignment. I went to mine and they said it's company policy that they won't be able to offer that because of all the relocation, consumer benefit crap. I know it's all BS but did you have trouble with them?
I went into a local firestone store and asked for the lifetime alignment. Gave them my credit card and I was done.

Repair Your Auto - Alignment Services | Firestone Complete Auto Care

Its even on their firestone website so I think your local store is messing with you. I paid around 140-150 but it has already paid for itself after 5 or so alignments.

Show them the website I linked. It clearly shows that it is in their company policy to sell lifetime alignments and to acknowledge it as long as you own the vehicle.

On a side note: not all firestone technicians are equally skilled. try different firestone stores to see if you get better service.
 

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you actually dont need an alignment... what you do is you set your car up to the summer height or the lowest you like. than you get it aligned with a few degrees of camber, that way in the winter when you raise it up your camber is correct for your winter tires:) thats what i do. you need an alignment after you install them the first time and thats it. if you wanna go crazy you can but why spend 100 bucks every time

when you raise or lower a car your not messing with your toe angles which is what eats tires. camber just wears un evenly it doesnt "eat" them. so just changing the ride height doesnt really mean you need an alignment ive been on coils for a year, one alignment after i installed the coils, and a year later a many changes to my height both sets of tires are perfect
 

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you actually dont need an alignment... what you do is you set your car up to the summer height or the lowest you like. than you get it aligned with a few degrees of camber, that way in the winter when you raise it up your camber is correct for your winter tires:) thats what i do. you need an alignment after you install them the first time and thats it. if you wanna go crazy you can but why spend 100 bucks every time
Fact: Changing ride height changes alignment specs (toe, camber, etc).

From personal experience, every time I messed with the height, the toe changed noticeably in addition to the camber. Because of this I'd disagree with what you posted. Even if your car is not modified, it is still good to get an alignment at least once a year. Things get loose and change the more you drive and it is a good way to ensure that you get the most life out of your tires. Maybe it is not absolutely needed, but I think it is more important than you say it is.
 

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I'm a HUGE fan of springs & shocks! Im not one to mess with the ride height. I just want a nice firm ride, not too low.

After dealing with coilovers recently, makes me like shocks/springs even more LOL

I have Neuspeed/Koni Shocks with Comptech springs. Had it for a good 4+ years, I like it a lot!

My previous car, which was an Integra I had Bilstein shocks with Comptech springs. I wish Bilsteins were easily obtainable for the TSX here

Shock & Springs FTW! :tu: LOL
 

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Fact: Changing ride height changes alignment specs (toe, camber, etc).

From personal experience, every time I messed with the height, the toe changed noticeably in addition to the camber. Because of this I'd disagree with what you posted. Even if your car is not modified, it is still good to get an alignment at least once a year. Things get loose and change the more you drive and it is a good way to ensure that you get the most life out of your tires. Maybe it is not absolutely needed, but I think it is more important than you say it is.
in no way does your ride height have any affect on your toe angle as long as you are not pushing the links to there limits which he will not be. Its basic geometry make a triangle hold the bottom of it on a table and move the tip up and down. do the two sides change there angle? nope, changing ride height wont affect your toe or caster, camber yes.
 

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in no way does your toe angle have any affect on how low or how high your car is as long as you are not pushing the links tho there limits which he will not be. Its basic geometry make a triangle hold the bottom of it on a table and move it up and down. do the two sides change there angle? nope, changing ride height wont affect your toe or caster, camber yes.
what you say makes sense, but i'm just referencing my experiences over the years. I get an alignment at least once a year and the specs pretty much stay the same each year, while every time I adjusted my ride, my toe and camber was off a little during the alignment. Correlation or causation? Maybe others will post what they've experienced.

By following your logic, it would pointless to even get the first alignment after a fresh suspension install. Installing a new suspension only moves the triangle down so only the camber will change. Did I miss something?
 

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what you say makes sense, but i'm just referencing my experiences over the years. I get an alignment at least once a year and the specs pretty much stay the same each year, while every time I adjusted my ride, my toe and camber was off a little during the alignment. Correlation or causation? Maybe others will post what they've experienced.

By following your logic, it would pointless to even get the first alignment after a fresh suspension install. Installing a new suspension only moves the triangle down so only the camber will change. Did I miss something?
as for that fresh install, well your disconnecting that point and you can skew it if it doesnt go in the EXACT spot.

im not saying your wrong about the once a year thing. it is good practice, needed ehh debatable.

my dad has a honda fit he drives to from NY to NJ almost everyday, the car is two years old on the same set of tires with only the original alignment.

They way our suspensions are set up you dont need an alignment if you are not moving the suspension more than about 1 inch.

Now if we move it say from stock than to slammed yes your toe will be different, alot? no, enough to eat up tires, not really. its not going to change all that much just because of the way the geometry of the suspension is(this only applies to this type of suspension each cars geo is very different)
 

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as for that fresh install, well your disconnecting that point and you can skew it if it doesnt go in the EXACT spot.

im not saying your wrong about the once a year thing. it is good practice, needed ehh debatable.

my dad has a honda fit he drives to from NY to NJ almost everyday, the car is two years old on the same set of tires with only the original alignment.

They way our suspensions are set up you dont need an alignment if you are not moving the suspension more than about 1 inch.

Now if we move it say from stock than to slammed yes your toe will be different, alot? no, enough to eat up tires, not really. its not going to change all that much just because of the way the geometry of the suspension is
I guess it boils down to how picky you are and how much money you have. :laugh:
 

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I guess it boils down to how picky you are and how much money you have. :laugh:
lmao pretty much, its not even the money thing its just that most shops around here cant hold my car slammed so i gotta get it aligned an inch higher than go home and lower it again:( so i do it once and call it a day.

Also potholes and speedbumbs(at a high speed) can change your alignment drastically if its a bad one
 

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lmao pretty much, its not even the money thing its just that most shops around here cant hold my car slammed so i gotta get it aligned an inch higher than go home and lower it again:( so i do it once and call it a day.

Also potholes and speedbumbs(at a high speed) can change your alignment drastically if its a bad one
Fortunately, the firestone near my house has a lift that is on ground level. You just drive your car on the lift and you're done. As long as you're not touching the ground already, you can make it on the lift. One of the main reasons I went ahead and got the lifetime alignment
 
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