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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Just wondering which is overall better quality worth for buying. All i know the difference between the 2 is the .3 or so inch drop difference. Just some info on which would have better ride quality, looks, handling, or anything else. Also if i installed some springs on my tsx, would i also have to upgrade my shocks too, or would i be able to keep my stock ones? Thanks
Mike
 

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There seems to be no official technical specifications on these 2 products from Eibach. From I can gather are the following;

- Prokit lowers the car approximately 1 inch all round while Sportline drops it even lower.

- Both uses progressive type springs, there is no official spring rate specifications but I can do doubt say that the lower the ride height is dropped, the higher the spring rate is to compensate/match with the OEM shock damper rates.

- Both are replacement springs for the OEM setup, so you can use the OEM shock without any problems. But over time, you will be increasing more wear and tear with the increase spring rate/lowered ride height.

In short, if you want a simple drop, the Prokit will be ideal but if you want the maximum drop level possible on the OEM shocks, the Sportline will be your choice. I'll strictly recommend the Prokit anyhow to maintain a close to OEM driving setup whilst having a lower right height, as time wears, the springs will "sag" and the spring height will drop even further lowering the car even more.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thank you!
Everything i wanted to know right there! :bowdown1:
 

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Noel said:
In short, if you want a simple drop, the Prokit will be ideal but if you want the maximum drop level possible on the OEM shocks, the Sportline will be your choice. I'll strictly recommend the Prokit anyhow to maintain a close to OEM driving setup whilst having a lower right height, as time wears, the springs will "sag" and the spring height will drop even further lowering the car even more.
Noel, what can be done with the "sagging" springs..is there something you can do when the springs are first mounted? does it become dangerous driving with "saggy" springs? are they weaker in structure or anything? can the springs be replaced? what would be the proper precautions?
 

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Spring "sagging" is caused by the OEM shock absorber wearing out due to running a higher spring rate as the OEM shock absorber isn't designed to be used with such a higher spring rate. This is a factual problem with all "spring jobs" where lowering vehicle height is employed by only replacing OEM springs while retaining the OEM shock.

This isn't a manufacturing defect by either the spring manufacturer or the OEM components but it's simply an incompatible/cost saving solution. The proper way is to use coilovers designed for specific height lowering with specific design tolerance on spring ratings. While sagged springs are not dangerous to drive on but will no doubt deteroriate handling chracteristics, overtime when your OEM shock fails due to premature wear and tear. You'd end up going through the same process again.

Yes, the springs can be replaced but the OEM shocks also have a specific lifetime and will need replacement as well. Failure can occur either caused by the shock or the spring or both. When lowered springs are employed, that whole suspension lifetime is significantly dropped and accelerated due to premature wear from a higher spring rating and also contributed by how it is driven/used. In short, the harder you drive the car, the faster this will happen.

The only correct and safe way to lower vehicle right height is full replacement coilovers. Yes, it may seem to be a higher price but how one measures safety and performance is an individual opinion. There's no cut corner way to improving handling. You either pay less and pay more later or you pay more initially and pay less later. Even coilovers need maintenance after an X amount of distance clocked to maintain it's specified performance settings.
 

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get the coilover .. ~~ if let me drop my car agian .. i will denfinitely go for coilover .. ~ but for us who got the repacement springs .. get a set of aftermarket shocks would simply make everything back in track .. ~
 

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Prokit&speedline

They are both not the best springs out there. Too soft for the shocks. I recommend the H&R sport springs, they are much stiffer and does not lower as much which keeps your shocks healthy. If you want a big drop, i would suggest getting some coilovers.
 

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The Prokit for the TSX is listed at 1.6" Front/ 1.4" rear; the Sportline is 1.9" Front / 1.6" Rear.

I personally know two people who have already pulled the Prokit off the TSX due to unacceptable ride quality with the factory struts. The Sportlines would only be worse. One guy changed over to the A-Spec setup, while the other went with Koni Sports with the Prokit springs. Both are much happier.

Being that you're in Florida, where the roads are probably smoother than here in the Northeast, you may not mind the degradation in ride quality as much, but as time passes, the ride will get bouncy.
 

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Yes I agree that, the H&R progressive springs are a good alternative to the Eibach springs.
 

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LannyM said:
The Prokit for the TSX is listed at 1.6" Front/ 1.4" rear; the Sportline is 1.9" Front / 1.6" Rear.

I personally know two people who have already pulled the Prokit off the TSX due to unacceptable ride quality with the factory struts. The Sportlines would only be worse. One guy changed over to the A-Spec setup, while the other went with Koni Sports with the Prokit springs. Both are much happier.
Lanny,

Have you had a chance to compare a prokit/Koni equipped TSX to your Aspec TSX? If so, what's your impression with respect to ride quality and handling. I would think that, even with Koni struts, the prokit/Koni equipped car would still bottom out a lot.
 

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AlterZgo said:
Lanny,

Have you had a chance to compare a prokit/Koni equipped TSX to your Aspec TSX? If so, what's your impression with respect to ride quality and handling. I would think that, even with Koni struts, the prokit/Koni equipped car would still bottom out a lot.
I have; let me give you my impression of all the setups I've experienced with the TSX.

Let me start by saying that, I live in the Northeast, where the roads are bad and we get a lot of snow, so I really don't want a slammed car to begin with. Also, I look at the TSX as a luxury/sport sedan-I take out clients with it, I bring my 11 month daughter out in it, so I want to retain a least a little of the comfortable feel to the car. The only reason I was looking to upgrade was that in stock form, the car had a little too much brake squat and body roll for those times that I'm alone in the car and just want to push it a little. Everyone has different needs/wants out of their TSX, and if someone is looking to make it a track car then they're going to have a completely different set of priorities in what they're looking for in a suspension.


  • Prokit on stock struts-This was on a local guys car, and I had a chance to drive it before I ordered the A-Spec. To me (and to him), this setup was awful. The car was really stiff, much more so than I would expect with a progressive rate spring. It was prone to bottoming out, and was very bouncy. Initial turn in felt better, and transitional moves were sharper, but mid corner bumps would unsettle the car to the point where you did not have a lot of confidence pushing it on the street-I was never sure if the car was going to stay planted or bounce offline.
  • Prokit on Koni's-After becoming annoyed with the Prokit, the car was upgraded with a set of Konis. This did improve some things-the bounciness is pretty much gone, and using the upper perch mount on the front struts, he gained about 1/2" of travel, which means less bottoming, but it still will on occasion. Also, the Koni's have adjustable dampening, which lets you tailor them a little to your springs. After driving it, I'm not sure if Koni's are really meant for progressive rate springs-you can't seem to dial it it where the dampening feels correct all the time. I would think a single rate spring like the Comptechs would be a better choice, but I have not tried it, so I'm only speculating.
  • A-Spec suspension-This set has been on my car for 6 months. The suspension works well in all circumstances that I have encountered, but it's not stiff enough for track use. It's still comfortable, but has elimanted a lot of the body roll/brake squat. It's way more comfortable than either of the Prokit setups, and it still allows me to push the car with more confidence/control. As winter has set in, I'm still on stock tires, but in the spring, I'm planning on going to Toyo T1S tires(or R if it's out) and adding a Comptech rear sway. I'm pretty sure the car will be awesome with that setup.
 

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Lanny,

Thanks for the info. Exactly what I was looking for. I'm probably going to go with the A-Spec suspension and a set of 05 TL 18x8" A-Spec rims and 235-40-18 tires.

Do you think the A-Spec struts would have enough dampening to properly control the heavier rims and tires?
 

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AlterZgo said:
Lanny,

Thanks for the info. Exactly what I was looking for. I'm probably going to go with the A-Spec suspension and a set of 05 TL 18x8" A-Spec rims and 235-40-18 tires.

Do you think the A-Spec struts would have enough dampening to properly control the heavier rims and tires?
You know, I've been thinking about the TL A-Spec rims for a long time, and it's the weight that keeps me from doing it, although it's not as bad as you might think.

The factory wheel/tire setup on the TSX is around 47lbs, which seems to be broken down as about 23lbs for the rim and 24lbs for the tire.

The A-spec rim is 26.5lb; if you went with the Toyo T1S in 235/40/18 you've got 22.9lb, so 49.4lb total, with less weight on the outer circumference. Not all the bad for a move up to 18"s and wider, and still a very strong wheel.

Chopping weight off, though, can make a huge difference. One guy (happens to be 2002 Solo National champ in H Stock) on the Mini2 Mini Cooper forum tested the stock 17" Cooper S Pirelli runflats and S-Lite rims which weigh in at 50lbs, and then some 16" 14lb Enkeis and 22lb Azenis, for a total weight reduction of 14lbs per corner, which is A LOT.

Here's the thread..... Mini Cooper test

And here's what he came up with.

17's
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0-60mph = 7.37, 6.74, 6.85 seconds
60-0mph = 127, 125, 133 feet

16's
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0-60mph = 6.57, 6.67, 6.52 seconds
60-0mph = 115, 111, 113 feet

Granted, some of this is attributable to the stickier Azenis', but these numbers show two things.

One; if every last bit of performance is important to you, then going with ultra light weight wheels and tires will give you a performance edge.

Two; adding 2.5lbs is probably not going to drastically effect numbers on the TSX; my guess would be you might feel a slight difference when launching, but other than that I think the overall experience with the 18"s would be better, due to better grip from whatever performance tire you go with.

I think the A-Spec would work well with this setup, assuming you stay away from the really heavy tires........
 

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Sounds like the TL Aspec rims are just what I need. My car is strictly a daily driver. It's an automatic (so wife can drive) so it's already pretty slow. :) I'm just looking for something to improve the appearance and tighten up the handling a bit.

I'll probably go with this combo plus the A-spec suspension once Acura figures out how to fix my camber issue. Right now, It's sitting at negative 2.1 on the rt rear and 1.0 on the left rear. If I have the dealer even out the camber w/ your suggested carriage adjustment, I'll be just .05 degrees per side outside of the accepted tolerance. I'm concerned that the A-spec drop will put it significantly out of spec. Assuming that the dealer is able to get my rear camber to -1.55 degrees per side, how much more negative camber do you think the A-spec suspension will add?
 

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AlterZgo said:
Sounds like the TL Aspec rims are just what I need. My car is strictly a daily driver. It's an automatic (so wife can drive) so it's already pretty slow. :) I'm just looking for something to improve the appearance and tighten up the handling a bit.

I'll probably go with this combo plus the A-spec suspension once Acura figures out how to fix my camber issue. Right now, It's sitting at negative 2.1 on the rt rear and 1.0 on the left rear. If I have the dealer even out the camber w/ your suggested carriage adjustment, I'll be just .05 degrees per side outside of the accepted tolerance. I'm concerned that the A-spec drop will put it significantly out of spec. Assuming that the dealer is able to get my rear camber to -1.55 degrees per side, how much more negative camber do you think the A-spec suspension will add?
I wish I had my car measured before the A-Spec went in; it had some, but I don't know how much.

Since you brought this problem up with your dealer before you've even done the A-Spec, you might be able to work out something with them that will get you the camber kit. If you tell them the car needs to be in spec, I'm not sure what else they could do. Then, if you do the A-Spec, you'll be able to bring it back in line. The Ingalls kit looks good.
 
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