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Discussion Starter #1
Has anyone here installed the rear camber kit and springs themselves? If so, how hard would you rate this install. And please let me know if there are any write-ups which i cant seem to find to installing these.
 

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The camber kit or should I say replacement arms are not hard. You usually remove the wheel, take a look at the replacement part and remove the bolts in place ... Simple bolt-on, plug and play.

As for replacement springs, this one's gonna be a PITA if you don't have experience on doing such jobs. It's also the same process as above but you'd have to remove the interior trim and seats for the rear shocks. Then removing the springs from the shock requires professional tools as the springs always spring out hard ... If it catches you by surprise, it can be fatal depending where the springs fly out.

I'd suggest getting the springs replacement especially on the OE setup done by a professional because of safety reasons. Springs have a sprung rating power to propel it a good 10 to 15 meters in a split second, imagine if that hit you or anyone or anything for that matter.
 

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owned ur ass
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Discussion Starter #3
Alright, I once had a buddy of mine install springs on my old 95 ford probe, i watched and aided in the whole process so im stuck on the line whether i should save 120 bucks and do it myself or get it done professionaly. Also, is it ok to install the rear camber kit right before i get my springs on or should i wait till after the springs are installed to do so
Thanks again
Mike
 

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Makes no difference on when you install the camber kit, but I'd suggest doing it after when you ride height has been changed. That way, you can make alignment adjustments accordingly to optimize your new setup.
 

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Noel said:
Makes no difference on when you install the camber kit, but I'd suggest doing it after when you ride height has been changed. That way, you can make alignment adjustments accordingly to optimize your new setup.
Yep, and infact depending on how the camber is you might not need the camber kit. Esp. if you are only going for a 1 inch drop.

And within the last two years I have either did or helped with lowering EP3's and RSX's (resulting in about 6 times all together), it takes time and the right tools. Not familiar if your suspension is nearly the same.

But you will need a second set of hands. And if you are doing it yourself, regardless if you or your friend have knowledge from other cars. You should try to get install instructions or similiar ones from somewhere.
 

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Personally I do all the work thats even been done to my TSX, only wrenches to touch her have been my own, but springs arnt something I want to play around w/...so does anyone know the average price of install for lets say the comptech springs, and i've heard they require a chamber kit as well. I've been quoted around 350$ for an install and that just dosent seem right
 

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I've got a quote for $150 to install all 4 springs... which takes about 1.5 hours...
But you need a good wheel alignment after which will cost close to $100...
Good luck...
 

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I'm still undecided about whether or not I want to go right into lowering my car, but I've been doing as much research as I can. It looks like I could get a full coilover kit for around $1000 and then the Ingalls Rear Camber Kit for like $200 (right???) or I could just get the Eibach Pro Kit for $250 and the Ingalls Rear Camber Kit for $200. So the totals would be $1200 vs. $450. BIG DIFFERENCE. Since my main purpose for lowering the car would be to purchase some aftermarket wheels, which will most likely cost me over $1000, I'm thinking that the more realistic plan is to go with just the Eibach Pro Kit and Rear Ingalls Camber Kit. I read in this by Noel that the camber kit is very simple to install and that it doesn't even require instructions. You basically just look at what's in place currently, remove the bolts and add the new kit. Now, I read that the camber kits can be adjustable, how do we know what setting we should adjust it to? Does this make sense? I'm still trying to understand the camber kits, so bear with me. I've installed springs before on my Integra and helped my bro with his WRX, so I'm somewhat experienced with the spring install so I'm not afraid to tackle this DIY project, but its the camber kit that I'm not knowledgable on. Right now on my Integra I have 1.5" all around GoldLine Springs matched with my stock shocks and its pretty abusive. Its fine on flat roads, but if there's any imperfections with the road, its a pretty harsh thump, especially when I had the 40 sidewalls on my 17s. Now that I have the 45 sidewalls and 16s it can withstand some potholes and railroad tracks. I'm hoping that this setup won't be as bad as my current Integra setup. I guess I'm just wondering if this "bouncing" feeling from just the Eibachs is really that bad or is it because one is very picky. I wish I could ride in someone's car with that setup to compare with what I got now on my Integra.
 

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jprovostla said:
I've got a quote for $150 to install all 4 springs... which takes about 1.5 hours...
But you need a good wheel alignment after which will cost close to $100...
Good luck...
Yeah...found a guy who will let me use his shop/tools to do it for 100$....and someone to do the alignment for 90....so thats what im probibly gonna do...
 

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virtualbong said:
I'm still undecided about whether or not I want to go right into lowering my car, but I've been doing as much research as I can. It looks like I could get a full coilover kit for around $1000 and then the Ingalls Rear Camber Kit for like $200 (right???) or I could just get the Eibach Pro Kit for $250 and the Ingalls Rear Camber Kit for $200. So the totals would be $1200 vs. $450. BIG DIFFERENCE. Since my main purpose for lowering the car would be to purchase some aftermarket wheels, which will most likely cost me over $1000, I'm thinking that the more realistic plan is to go with just the Eibach Pro Kit and Rear Ingalls Camber Kit. I read in this by Noel that the camber kit is very simple to install and that it doesn't even require instructions. You basically just look at what's in place currently, remove the bolts and add the new kit. Now, I read that the camber kits can be adjustable, how do we know what setting we should adjust it to? Does this make sense? I'm still trying to understand the camber kits, so bear with me. I've installed springs before on my Integra and helped my bro with his WRX, so I'm somewhat experienced with the spring install so I'm not afraid to tackle this DIY project, but its the camber kit that I'm not knowledgable on. Right now on my Integra I have 1.5" all around GoldLine Springs matched with my stock shocks and its pretty abusive. Its fine on flat roads, but if there's any imperfections with the road, its a pretty harsh thump, especially when I had the 40 sidewalls on my 17s. Now that I have the 45 sidewalls and 16s it can withstand some potholes and railroad tracks. I'm hoping that this setup won't be as bad as my current Integra setup. I guess I'm just wondering if this "bouncing" feeling from just the Eibachs is really that bad or is it because one is very picky. I wish I could ride in someone's car with that setup to compare with what I got now on my Integra.
Or you could do the Neuspeed/Koni struts and the Eibach Prokit Springs for less than $800, AND have a strut with adjustability. This is cheaper than full coilovers and would give a much better ride than the ProKit alone.

If you do the install yourself, you need to bring the car in for a professional alignment fairly soon. Bring in the instructions with your camber kit; the tech will use them to help him set the camber. You're probably looking to be around -1.0 degree rear camber; factory spec range is -1.5 to -.5. This is one thing you will not be able to do yourself.

Some install techs can get the car very close without an alignment rack due to years of experience. In this case, I would suggest driving around for a couple of weeks to let the springs settle before getting an alignment. But, if the settings were way off (and if you do it yourself they might be), a bad toe setting could wipe the tires out in a matter of a couple of days.

Oh, and I think one of the board sponsers, UltraRev, has the Ingalls rear kit for $139......

UltraRev/Ingalls Camber Kit
 

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LannyM said:
Or you could do the Neuspeed/Koni struts and the Eibach Prokit Springs for less than $800, AND have a strut with adjustability. This is cheaper than full coilovers and would give a much better ride than the ProKit alone.

If you do the install yourself, you need to bring the car in for a professional alignment fairly soon. Bring in the instructions with your camber kit; the tech will use them to help him set the camber. You're probably looking to be around -1.0 degree rear camber; factory spec range is -1.5 to -.5. This is one thing you will not be able to do yourself.

Some install techs can get the car very close without an alignment rack due to years of experience. In this case, I would suggest driving around for a couple of weeks to let the springs settle before getting an alignment. But, if the settings were way off (and if you do it yourself they might be), a bad toe setting could wipe the tires out in a matter of a couple of days.

Oh, and I think one of the board sponsers, UltraRev, has the Ingalls rear kit for $139......

UltraRev/Ingalls Camber Kit
Thanks LannyM, I did see this and I'm going to try to make a decision in the upcoming weeks. I really would like some aftermarket rims, but if I go with the entire strut/spring combo, I probably won't have enough for rims. We'll see though.
 

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virtualbong said:
Now, I read that the camber kits can be adjustable, how do we know what setting we should adjust it to? Does this make sense? I'm still trying to understand the camber kits, so bear with me. ... <snip>.... Right now on my Integra I have 1.5" all around GoldLine Springs matched with my stock shocks and its pretty abusive. Its fine on flat roads, but if there's any imperfections with the road, its a pretty harsh thump, especially when I had the 40 sidewalls on my 17s. Now that I have the 45 sidewalls and 16s it can withstand some potholes and railroad tracks. I'm hoping that this setup won't be as bad as my current Integra setup. I guess I'm just wondering if this "bouncing" feeling from just the Eibachs is really that bad or is it because one is very picky. I wish I could ride in someone's car with that setup to compare with what I got now on my Integra.
The camber kit is adjustable and would be adjusted by the person performing the alignment on your car. The way most people install the kit is to simply adjust the arm to match the length of the stock arm and install it that way. This will keep you at the baseline stock amount of camber (unless of course you lowered your car in which you will have increased negative camber, but to the exact same degree as you would have w/ the stock part).

What is likely happening on your integra w/ goldlines+stock shocks is that your car is bottoming out. The greater stiffness of the springs themselves do not cause the bouncey harsh ride quality. It is due to lack of suspension travel causing the car to bottom out and also lack of rebound damping causing the car to oscillate up and down instead of taking a firm stance.

It sounds counterintuitive, but many who install much stiffer rate springs paired with proper dampers that can handle the stiffer spring rate report an actual improvement in ride quality b/c the car is no longer bottoming out and doesn't feel floaty compared to cars lowered with softer springs and stock shocks.

This brings me to another issue. On the other forum, you had mentioned having problems w/ bending your aftermkt rims on the Integra and being concerned about upgrading to 18s on the TSX due to the same issue.

If your car is bottoming out AND you hit a pothole, it will likely damage your rim b/c what is happening is your 2800 lb car is slamming its full weight on the rim/tire and on the pothole. So, if you install a properly matched spring/shock combintation which keeps the car from bottoming out, it will actually prevent you from damaging your rims - even if you are running lower profile tires. It's like jumping from a height of 10 feet onto a super stiffly spring trampoline or a very softly sprung trampoline. On the soft trampoline, when you land on it, it will stretch and your foot would hit the hard floor. On the super stiff trampoline, the initial contact will feel stiffer, but you are prevented from touching the floor so you will not have the super harsh bottoming out feeling. You would be much more likely to break your leg on the softly sprung trampoline due to the much higher likelihood of hitting the hard floor.
 

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AlterZgo - Again, you have been very helpful! I never really thought of the bottoming out to be the cause of my bent rims and this definitely could of been the reason. This now is going to be a big decision to make and will require me to totally revamp my research and start reading over threads again. Here are the options that I'm thinking about:

1. Eibach Pro Kit matched with Koni Yellow and Rear Ingalls Camber Kit
2. Some type of coilover and Rear Ingalls Camber Kit

If I go the coilover route, I am very clueless on which ones are reliable. I have read that some coilovers will rust and seize (ie. Tein Coilovers I believe). Should I stick with strut/spring combo or are coilovers really worth the money? I really won't be changing the height nor will I need to change the dampening since I would only use this for daily driving and the once in awhile spirited driving. Definitely no track time whatsoever (ie. drag or autox). Anyone have any suggestions and reasoning why I would go with what coilover? I will spend an extra hundred if a coilover is really worth the money over spring/strut combo.
 

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Koni/Neuspeed Struts $550 on eBay.
ProKit $200 on eBay.

The only coilover that comes close in price would be the Tein Basic, which is going to have a much higher spring rate, and no damping adjustabilty.

The H&R coilovers look interesting, but they're $1k, and still no damping adjustability, and I've yet to find out the spring rates.
 

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LannyM said:
Koni/Neuspeed Struts $550 on eBay.
ProKit $200 on eBay.

The only coilover that comes close in price would be the Tein Basic, which is going to have a much higher spring rate, and no damping adjustabilty.

The H&R coilovers look interesting, but they're $1k, and still no damping adjustability, and I've yet to find out the spring rates.
Yeah, the preferred coilovers seems to be the Teins. They cost wayyyyy too much so I think I'm going to stick with the Eibach Pro Kit and Koni Yellows. And definitely the Rear Ingalls Camber Kit. Can someone link me to the Rear Ingalls Camber Kit that I would have to pick up? Doesn't one of the sponsors sell a set for a decent price?

Ok, can someone tell me if this is what I need to get for the Rear Ingalls Camber Kit?
 
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