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Discussion Starter #1
I thought I would add another review for those thinking about upgrading their OEM rear sway bar to a Progress rear sway bar.

Install:

Total install time including replacing endlinks: Approximately 3 hours and required only basic tools.
I'm sure there are plenty of people that could have done it in shorter amount of time but I had trouble removing the OEM endlinks.

Highly recommend for 2004-2005 TSX owners to upgrade their endlinks to either 2006-2008 endlinks or aftermarket endlinks.

Install was fairly easy but time consuming due to the fact that I changed out my endlinks as well. I went ahead and bought Moog endlinks and thought I would give them a try since they were really affordable and for my needs, I do not require adjustable endlinks. At first I was on the fence about if I should go ahead and replace my endlinks during the install, or if I should just see if the OEM endlinks do break and then replace them. Once I got the car up on jack stands and removed the wheel to take a look at the OEM sway bar and endlinks, my mind was set on replacing the endlinks. They look to be made to support the design of the OEM sway bar load and no more. Other than that, install was basically- look at how the OEM sway bar was mounted and replicate that with the Progress rear sway bar.

Install tips:

Endlink removal:
Use a wire brush and scrub diligently on the threads and the nut. Once done, spray with PB Blaster and repeat on the other side. While I waited a few minutes for the PB Blaster to penetrate as much as it could, I loosened the nuts holding the OEM sway bar brackets.

If you have a racheting wrench, use that to remove the nut on the endlink while trying to hold the hex key as perfectly seated as possible. If you do not hold the hex key as square as possible there is a strong chance you will strip it. You have been warned.

General install tip/idea
Reading a post from another member, I also wrapped the bar in teflon tape where the bushings would be clamping in addition to greasing them to hopefully prolong any chance of squeaks- we'll see how well that will hold up.


Review:

Disclaimer- Keep in mind this review is purely subjective and others may feel differently. I have a few years (perhaps miles is a better description) under my belt in understanding and testing handling characteristics but by no means an expert.

Setting: Stiffest setting

I have had my car pretty much stock for about a year. No suspension mods, just an intake, and Maven countersunk shift knob. I'm a strong believer in knowing your car inside and out and deciding what "deficiencies" need to be worked on to make you happy. I have learned the characteristics of this car in OEM setup as much as possible within the limits of my all season tire grip and without professional advice. Now let's get on to the good stuff...


First test I did was a slalom test.
I progressively increased the speed as I was doing a slalom. Throughout the slalom, the car followed through well and the speed of slalom was increased from stock. Body roll was reduced and car responded better to directional changes. Towards the end of the slalom where my speed was highest, I actually got the rear end to kick out just a bit as my front tires were beginning to cry (I am running on all-season tires so grip isn't the best). This is a bit of a thumbs up from me as I see this as a more balanced handling characteristic from the back of the car to the front.

Second test for me was a lightly- cambered, medium-speed, tight chicane that required about 50 degrees of steering input from center on back-to-back turns. Speed was held constant throughout the chicane.

I felt a big improvement on this test. On pretty much any turn taken at a brisk pace, OEM setup felt like the front was doing all of the work and the rear of the car was just being dragged like a wagon without much handling input. Don't get me wrong, the OEM setup is great but once you get used to the characteristics, that's how it started to feel. It felt as if the front was being over-worked when being pushed to the limits of my all season tires(mechanical grip) probably due to the body roll and outside tires being stressed more than the inside tires of a turn.
With the Progress rear sway bar installed, once the weight of the car is settled to one side during a turn, the car felt much more neutral (the planted feeling that people say although I consider that terminology a bit vague). It felt as if the mechanical grip/work load was more evenly distributed between the back-to-front and side-to-side of the car during mid-corner and corner exit. As stated earlier, the car felt more neutral than set for understeer from the factory. This same improvement can be felt on turns such as highway entrance ramps with a constant radius bend.

I say this modification was definitely worth investing into if you enjoy the feeling of lateral g-force. I'm a bit of a lateral g-force junky. I've seen this sway bar go used and new from about $100 to $160(with shipping). Either used or new, I would definitely consider this upgrade a bang for your buck.


Cheers,
J-Trix
 

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, Chief SuperModerator, Info Center / Car Care & D
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Lovely review. Will be stickied for a week.
 

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Repped and thanks, I've been contemplating this mod for a couple of weeks now, definitely getting RSB and Moog links now, thanks!
 

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I think this is one of the best mods and really changes the way the car handles turns on an OEM setup. This was the first mod I ever did and I am glad it was too.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Lovely review. Will be stickied for a week.
Thanks, I tried to be as descriptive as possible to help people decide for themselves if this mod was right for them. Sorry you guys if I was a bit wordy.

Repped and thanks, I've been contemplating this mod for a couple of weeks now, definitely getting RSB and Moog links now, thanks!
Thanks for the rep! I like the Moog endlinks. Some people don't like them cause you have to re-grease them every so often. I have a grease pump that fits over the fitting so it's a real simple task to do. I figure I'll do that whenever it comes time to re-grease the bushings.

Great review +uno

Have mine laying around, should be on this weekend :D
Thanks for the positive comments BluLabel and others. If you guys have any specific questions about it that I didn't cover, just ask. I'm more than willing to help.

Again, be careful when removing the endlinks. I stripped one of the hex key inserts when I went to remove it and had to grind the bolt off. It was a good thing I picked up the Moog endlinks. The Moog endlinks have a much easier design than the OEM endlinks to install and remove if you have to do so later on.
 

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, Regional Meet Leader, Vancouver
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Nice review. I loved my RSB since the day I got it.
 

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" It Is What It Is "
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Today I was on the highway back home and boy really put it to the limit and it deff does the job ... I had a wow factor on my face ...
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Today I was on the highway back home and boy really put it to the limit and it deff does the job ... I had a wow factor on my face ...
I have quite a nasty 30 miles one way commute to and from work with that's about 50/50 highway and city. About 1-2 commutes a week, I'll usually detour the easy straight through turnpike route and take a longer backroad route to have a nice wind down from work. I took the backroad route home every day this week since I installed my RSB. :mardi:
 

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Discussion Starter #14
I've been contemplating this mod for a bcouple of weeks now
Well then my advice is to give it some more thought. No need to rush into modding your car. If you just take turns like the average person and don't really push it then this wouldn't benefit you much. If you're the type of person to find yourself accelerating out of the apex of corners then this would be a fun mod for you

There is also the slightly less aggressive TLS RSB that's cheaper that might interest you.
 

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Thanks for the great review. I have had this sway bar sitting in storage for almost a full year now because I have lost the desire to do anything at all to my ride (dont know what got into me haha). Well the modding bug has finally hit me again and this review reminded me that I have a nice treat for my ride waiting to get installed. Going to dust off the box and install it first thing tomorrow.

Dont know what was holding me back this long for such a simple install especially since the sway bar is already in my possession.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Install is fairly simple. Take your time and enjoy wrenching on your car. Like I said in the review, be careful to not strip the endlinks. I don't know what I would do if I didn't have a replacement endlink for the one I stripped.
 

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great review! I have one of these myself and it is such a great mod! Many owners end up buying a front strut bar first becuase of the "dress up look" but this discrete and hidden mod is definitely worth it. One thing I would recommend is buying the Energy bushings for this bar that way you don't always have to keep removing the bushings to re-grease them.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
One thing I would recommend is buying the Energy bushings for this bar that way you don't always have to keep removing the bushings to re-grease them.
Are you saying you can regrease them while still on the car? Really? Interesting....
 

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What size was the sway bar that you installed? 22mm? Anyone have any discussion on vendors w/ pricing? I've been itching to install this upgrade for quite some time, just haven't had the time to get off work. The factory sway bar is squeaking like something fierce.
 
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