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Discussion Starter #3
nah, maybe a google search will help, i really wanna see if the interior compares to the tsx
 

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General Information
Year 2005
Manufacturer Subaru
Model Legacy
Trim GT
Body Type Sedan
Base MSRP $28,000 USD
Curb Weight 3,200 lbs.

Engine / Transmission
Type 2.5 Liter Turbocharged
Cylinders 4
Horsepower 250 @ 5800 RPM
Torque 230 @ 3800 RPM
Redline -----
Drive Train Front Engine / AWD
Gear Type 5-Speed Manual

Performance
0-60 mph 6.1 sec
0-100 mph -----
¼ Mile 14.2 @ 98 mph
Top Speed 130 mph
Gas Mileage 18 MPG City / 24 MPG Highway
 

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:D found a nice pic

The new midsize 2005 Subaru Legacy, debuting in Spring 2004, has sharper new styling boasting a very aerodynamic Cd is 0.28 for the sedan and 0.30 for the wagon. The chassis changes slightly, with a 20mm longer wheelbase. The lighter new Legacy is also 35mm wider, 30mm longer and 15mm taller than the outgoing model. But the big news is the huge power upgrade for the top model.
The US-spec Legacy GT model will now have a turbocharged 2.5L 4 cylinder boxer engine featuring AVCS variable valve timing. Essentially the same engine used in the Impreza WRX STi, but detuned in this application, it has more than 80 extra horsepower over the weak outgoing model. This US-spec engine is larger than the Japan-spec 2.0L turbo engine, but the Japanese engine has a higher power output of 280 hp, versus the 250 hp of the US-spec engine.
Large 17 inch alloy wheels, turn indicators on the mirrors and frameless doors give the car an upscale look. A five-speed manual transmission is still standard, a rarity among midsize sedans, but a slick five-speed automanual gearbox is also being offered.
Also standard is its advanced symmetrical AWD drivetrain. Subaru has one of the world's most advanced all-wheel-drive system, perfected through its rally heritage. The system is one of the lightest in the market and, combined with weight savings elsewhere, keeps the Legacy's overall weight quite low for a fully-loaded midsize sedan. Build quality is exceptional, with a higher grade of materials now being used for the interior, making it a direct competitor to smaller entry-level German imports.
Like the older model, the chassis is equipped with MacPherson struts up front and a rear multi-link setup. But the new model gets the rear suspension control arms made of lightweight forged alloy. The chassis is also stiffer due to new ring-shaped reinforcement frames and reinforced subframe around the pillars.
Safety features include front and side airbags, ABS, VDC stability system, whiplash-resistant headrests and a more rigid body shell. Standard interior features include a steering wheel that adjusts for tilt and reach, electric mirrors, windows and central locking, air conditioning and and CD stereo.
ModernRacer.com

The growth in vehicle size pays off inside, but not in all areas. Legroom front and rear is good, shoulder room is more than adequate for two abreast, though three will squeeze, and there's enough under seat room for back seat feet. Rear headroom in the sedan is questionable for anyone six foot and over. The wagon's less sloping roofline makes it a better choice for vertically enhanced rear seat occupants.
Boot space in the sedan is cavernous, though the rear seats don't fold for longer loads. The only flexibility you've got is a ski hatch through to the back seats. Also, there's no release on the boot, so you'll need the key to open it. The wagon features flat-folding rear seats which makes big loads a doddle.
Road cars usually don't translate well to the racetrack. The artificial surface and propensity for the driver to push the vehicle hard makes it feel and look loose, floppy, roly-poly - almost like piloting a bowl of Aeroplane Jelly. Funny thing is, the Legacy acquitted itself admirably under the harshest of conditions. The engines, chassis, brakes, steering - everything about the Legacy elicited approving murmurs from the globe's major journalists.
Subaru's pretty keen on promoting the 'neutral handling' characteristics of its symmetrical drivetrain. Fact is, it ain't. Like all good passenger cars, the Legacy pushes the nose calmly and steadily wide when the driver exceeds grip, and only the rudest liftoff will unsettle the rear. There's plenty to be said for all-wheel drive grip, and given the choice between it and front wheel drive, we'd choose it every time, in all conditions. Legacy's steering and brakes responded well to the brutal treatment.
Those who were unlucky enough to drive the previous model Legacy B4 twin-turbo, not sold in the States, will remember a torque curve that had plenty in common with the Golden Arches. Not what you'd call seamless torque. Subaru has thankfully ditched the twin-turbo setup for the new GT, going with a single setup with lighter components that spool up quicker.
The result is a fantastically seamless and progressive power delivery which thrusts the Legacy forward eagerly and voraciously. It's no secret the manual has significantly more punch, but even the automatic GT delivers huge rewards under power.
Carpoint.com.au

Those engines will be packed into a shell that, despite looking similar to the current Legacy while incorporating numerous structural improvements, actually weighs significantly less than the current shell, which not only pays fuel-consumption dividends but also makes the Legacy an even more entertaining steer than before. Though Subaru's insistence that it handles with total neutrality are off base - like any car with a front weight bias, it will ultimately understeer unless you provoke the tail with a deliberate lift and then a jab at the gas - the new Legacy certainly dives into corners with un-sedan-like eagerness and can maintain cornering speeds that would shame many a sporty car. The suspension, struts up front and a four-link arrangement in the rear, keeps the tires firmly in contact with the ground while dispatching with mid-corner bumps; the brakes finally have the firm, positive feel we've been asking for years of Subaru. In highway conditions, refinement is impressive, with little wind whistle and tire roar making their way into the cabin.
Canadiandriver.com
 

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Nice car and all but not in the tsx class still would not give up my tsx for it :D
 

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not to mention what the residual is on subarus, after you get one trade in value is next to nothing, the tsx will hold up 10xs better plus its a honda....hehe
 

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Luwin1026 said:
I'll take one in STi trim!
STi is nice and fast perfect for a race car. But not for everyday use or driving long trips. When I was buying the TSX i wanted a practical car that I can use everyday and not worry about any problems that turbo'ed cars have. :D
 

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Looks like a cross between a SAAB 9-5 (nice-looking) and a Ford Taurus (terrible-looking).

I think based on HP & AWD, that this car will be targeted more at the G35x rather than the TSX.

The limited availability of the TSX (only 15k sales per yr.) and the proven reliability and resale of Honda/Acura make the TSX a better car overall - even if beaten by HP.
 

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I almost forgot -

The TSX is currently available with AWD in Japan.
If auto enthusiats (aka TSX owners) express to Acura our desires for AWD in N. America, Acura will most certainly make AWD available here (even if only in real limited numbers).
 

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hot4carz said:
I almost forgot -

The TSX is currently available with AWD in Japan.
If auto enthusiats (aka TSX owners) express to Acura our desires for AWD in N. America, Acura will most certainly make AWD available here (even if only in real limited numbers).
Really is there any more info on this anywhere?
 

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I can't read Japanese, but you can clearly see from these charts on Honda Japan's home site that the Accord/Accord Euro-R are offered with an AWD/FWD option.

<strong><a href="http://www.honda.co.jp/factbook/auto/ACCORD/200210/32.html" target="new">Chart 1</a></strong>

<strong><a href="http://www.honda.co.jp/factbook/auto/ACCORD/200210/35.html" target="new">Chart 2</a></strong>

I've also come across this fact mentioned by several owners of the Accord in Japan & Europe.

An AWD Accord (TSX in U.S.) is out there - It's up to us owners to stress to Honda/Acura that we want it made available here too.

I for one will certainly trade up to a AWD TSX as soon as it's made available in the U.S.
 

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Honda USA originally announced 15,000 TSXs to be sold per year in the U.S.

Due to overwhelling success, this number was bumped up. Honda may continue to increase its production numbers for the TSX as more people become aware of this model, but will not sell any where near the number of U.S.-spec Accords (400,000+ per year!).

Here in South Florida I see Accords, 3 series & A4s all over town. I have to really be on the lookout for a TSX & even then I go days without seeing one.

But this isn't even the topic at hand -
I can't wait for the TSX AWD to be made available in the U.S.
 
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