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I thought I'd bring this one up since last week I have now had 2 flats in less than a week, both times the tires could not be repaired! :mad:

All my previous Hondas had 60 series Michelins and I don't remember the last time we had a flat. Now, the TSX with 50 series, appears to be more prone to getting flats.

Is it just bad luck or are lower profile tires unable to resisit nails, screws and wood chips as well?

I know a number of you have voiced your opinions with some negative comments about Michelins. But I'm wondering how everyone else is doing with theirs? :confused:
 

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hip said:
I thought I'd bring this one up since last week I have now had 2 flats in less than a week, both times the tires could not be repaired! :mad:

All my previous Hondas had 60 series Michelins and I don't remember the last time we had a flat. Now, the TSX with 50 series, appears to be more prone to getting flats.

Is it just bad luck or are lower profile tires unable to resisit nails, screws and wood chips as well?

I know a number of you have voiced your opinions with some negative comments about Michelins. But I'm wondering how everyone else is doing with theirs? :confused:
Basically, I'd say that you're having bad luck. Lower profile tires aren't prone to getting flats than other tires... they do, however, make your rims prone to damage in the event of running over a pothole.

I had to replace one of the Michelins on my GS-R after only having the car a few hundred miles because something cut the inside sidewall of the tire (unrepairable).

I eventually got rid of the Michelins when they wore out and replaced them with Dunlops. I had to get one of them plugged at one point because I ran over a screw.

In your case, I wouldn't say the problem is due to the fact that they are low profile tires or even that they are Michelins... it's just bad luck.

On a related note, I seem to have the same luck as you do with my motorcycle. I have yet to wear out a rear tire since I've owned it... it seems to be a magnate for screws after they are only half worn out.

Good luck.
 

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hondafreak4eva said:
low profile tires do bubble easy .. which regular tires don't..

but yeah about the flats i woudl say bad luck :(
Bubble?
 

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I don't know if it has anything to do with "lower profile," but I'm pretty sure these tires have relatively thin sidewalls, and maybe that's it.

Early on, I got a flat from brushing the tire against a jagged curb. It was a pretty bad scrape but I don't think most tires would have gone flat.
 

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hondafreak4eva said:
bubble --> protrusion of the sidewall of the tire. usually happens when hitting a pothole. all that pressure has to go somewhere so it ends up in a weak part of the sidewall.
Gotcha... thanks!
 

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larchmont said:
I don't know if it has anything to do with "lower profile," but I'm pretty sure these tires have relatively thin sidewalls, and maybe that's it.

Early on, I got a flat from brushing the tire against a jagged curb. It was a pretty bad scrape but I don't think most tires would have gone flat.
Actually, lower profile tires (if they are any good) should have stronger sidewalls than a higher profile tire. Since there is less sidewall on the tire, it has to take more pressure when the car is changing direction. However, any force concentrated on one area of the tire (i.e. when hitting a curb or a pothole) will usually cause damage it for the same reason.
 
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