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arucA xsT
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118 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I recently came across some Axis Pentagon rims I'd love to buy and put on my Tsx. The stats are 19x8.5 with a 35 offset. For the back, I'm looking to lower to the point that the rims are nicely tucked, the upper part of the tire barely peaking out in the back.

Those rims in the front should be close to flush in the front. I think in another post, a member said 40 would make it flush, so it's not terribly far away.

an example is our forum members, Johnny Ly, car. Johnny, if you reading, fantastic car by the way :)

To get the back tucked, I think some fender rolling needs to be done so there's no rubbing or negative attributes involved with installing those rims and getting what I want, which is okay with me.

any advice on whether anything body-wise will need to be done to the car? Obviously it's gonna be lowered, and I do plan on getting cambers in the front and back, because Mr.Helltoe offers a fantastic deal along with purchasing the up and coming Ht spec type 2 coilover system.

Any advice from anybody whose Tsx is rocking mesh shoes will be greatly appreciated.
 

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long-term build
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2,761 Posts
8.5 +35 won't be much of an issue at all.

I'd suggest rolling the front fenders, and while you're doing it, do the back too.

that should be about all the work you need done. adjust your camber to fit.
 

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arucA xsT
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118 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
my hero! I was thinking about rolling the fenders any ways. Lol I take it it'll look weird if I ever decide to put my stocks back on?
 

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long-term build
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2,761 Posts
nah, it won't look weird.
well stock wheels always look weird to me, so you know, lol.
it'll look fine.

just make sure that they're rolled right with great attention to
the paint and not damaging it.

and yeah, up front, when you drop it, it'll create a fair amount of
"natural" negative camber. and that will probably be sufficient to
get the rims to fit, but you'll need a kit if you want to fine tune
your setup.
 

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arucA xsT
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118 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
choices??? Roll or cut fender

I came across something called the google custom search :laugh:
who knew it was there lol.

There were quite a few older posts from some of the forum members saying that they wished they cut the fenders instead of rolling em. Rolling sounds like it'll maybe chip my paint if someone doesn't know what they are doing.

I hear cutting the fender would be safer also and provide the same benefit as rolling the fender? Also, would cutting the fender provide the same "look" of a tucked rim in the rear?

Also, I think a 40 offset gives a flush look. 35 isn't all that far, so would any rolling be needed to cancel out a potential rubbing issue?

Tekneek, fight broke out at the Elk Grove in and out burger lol. Animal style makes people crazy!
 

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, Chief SuperModerator, Marketplace
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5,412 Posts
If you cut, you'll lose the structural strength of the fender. I know of a shop I'm sac that rolls fenders well. The place is called driven authority. I think it was like 50 bucks each fender, which is kinda pricy but it is a shop and I'm sure they'll take responsibility if they screw up. I have a friend with a eastwood fender roller who can do it for 25 per fender so let me know.
 

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instagram:emseecoy
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1,337 Posts
Cutting fenders is for individuals who do not want that flare look on the car. After you roll fenders, you can notice a very small flare. If you stand back and observe the car, you can pretty much tell it is rolled due to the more roundness of the fenders. Cutting is to prevent this. Some people dislike that flared look, but still want more clearance to run aggressive wheels. There is a member on here who cut her fenders because she wanted the car to look "stock" still.

The downfall of cutting fenders is the higher possibility of rusting. Since you are cutting, your removing the paint and exposing it which can result in rust. Another problem is that your fenders may cut your tires. Since it is not rolled with a smooth edge, cut fenders have sharp endpoints which can shave your tires over time if your too aggressive.

The key to fender cutting is to know the exact wheel size and tire size you want to run. After getting those measurements down, you will know how much to cut.

When tekneek stated, "structural strength" he is explaining how cut fenders can lose their strength over time and that area can "cave" in. A perfect example can be seen on s2000s. After cutting their fenders, the section right next to the gas cap will cave in due to the stress.

Hope this helps.
 

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arucA xsT
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118 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
sweet. Thanks for the recommendations in Sac, Tek. I'll keep them in mind after everything is delivered and done for. I guess a reputable shop should handle this easily. meh, little flare, I dont mind at all. I think it'll stick more the flare of the back wouldn't "match up" withe the rims. The Axis pentagons I'm looking at I think is 19x8.5 with a 35 offset.

Much love, fellas.
 
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