Acura TSX Forum banner
1 - 15 of 15 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
68 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I bought my automatic 06 tsx in February. The previous owner did a trans flush in November 2011 at around 65k miles (I have the receipt so I know it's legit). Im now at 75k in August and upon checking the fluid realized I had almost none left. Is this normal? I put 50k on a Volkswagen Jetta and never had to mess with transmission fluid. I know it's not leaking anywhere, that would be pretty obvious. Is it "eating" it, or is this the norm? Thanks in advance.

Sent from my DROID X2 using AutoGuide.Com Free App
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
325 Posts
Well it can't "eat it" like an engine. The trans has no way to consume fluid the way an engine can with oil.

I'd recommend getting under the car and looking around the axles seals, where the axles go into the transmission. Also look around the inspection cover at the bottom of the trans where it bolts to the engine. Look for trans fluid at either of these locations, or for discolored areas there that may be damp or darker and gritty. That'd indicate its a slow leak that's picking up road grit. If it's all dry, or roughly the same color/same amount of dirt there as compared to other locations then it's probably not leaking there.

Also check the lines running from the trans to the radiator for wet spots/fluid/excessive slimy grit. Lastly, look around the radiator for any darker fluid or cracks.

I'm not going to say it's impossible for the trans cooler in the radiator to be under higher pressure than the main coolant radiator is, but I've never seen trans fluid get pushed into the engines cooling system through a shared chamber cracked. I've seen the other way around, where coolant is forced into the trans cooler however. Best of luck.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
604 Posts
It is most certainly not normal. I would agree with what Adam stated as good places to check for issues/leaks. Are the shifts incredibly rough between gears?? Did you check the fluid while the engine was running and the car was in P?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
325 Posts
It is most certainly not normal. I would agree with what Adam stated as good places to check for issues/leaks. Are the shifts incredibly rough between gears?? Did you check the fluid while the engine was running and the car was in P?
Good call, but most Hondas aren't checked with the engine running. Actually, I can't think of any made after the late 90's.

To check the fluid level, allow the car car to run until the engine is at normal operating temperature; either by letting it idle in the driveway, or even after driving it. It won't matter, just make sure it's warm enough to cause the cooling fan to come on when it's sitting in park (make sure it's the cooling fan, not just the A/C condenser fan cycling).

After its warm, turn it off then check the fluid level. Let us know if anything suggested turns up anything, or not even.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
68 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I checked it both with and with out the engine running, cold and normal temp, etc. The shifting was actually fine. I just decided to check all fluids since I just did an oil change. Ill check those spots this evening. If its leaking somewhere, it's definitely not making it to the pavement.

Sent from my DROID X2 using AutoGuide.Com Free App
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,513 Posts
Well it can't "eat it" like an engine. The trans has no way to consume fluid the way an engine can with oil.

I'd recommend getting under the car and looking around the axles seals, where the axles go into the transmission. Also look around the inspection cover at the bottom of the trans where it bolts to the engine. Look for trans fluid at either of these locations, or for discolored areas there that may be damp or darker and gritty. That'd indicate its a slow leak that's picking up road grit. If it's all dry, or roughly the same color/same amount of dirt there as compared to other locations then it's probably not leaking there.

Also check the lines running from the trans to the radiator for wet spots/fluid/excessive slimy grit. Lastly, look around the radiator for any darker fluid or cracks.

I'm not going to say it's impossible for the trans cooler in the radiator to be under higher pressure than the main coolant radiator is, but I've never seen trans fluid get pushed into the engines cooling system through a shared chamber cracked. I've seen the other way around, where coolant is forced into the trans cooler however. Best of luck.
This is not true, A MT has no real way of burning or using oil but an AT does. There are many clutch plates inside that can and will heat up if they are worn or warped they will create excess heat causing the oil to turn to a sludge mixture and decreasing the volume of the oil. This is the exact reason for an AT fluid cooler. I would take apart the cooler and flush it out to make sure there are no clogs, as well as replace the fluid.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
325 Posts
This is not true, A MT has no real way of burning or using oil but an AT does. There are many clutch plates inside that can and will heat up if they are worn or warped they will create excess heat causing the oil to turn to a sludge mixture and decreasing the volume of the oil. This is the exact reason for an AT fluid cooler. I would take apart the cooler and flush it out to make sure there are no clogs, as well as replace the fluid.
This is incorrect. Not trying to bash at all, but this would be misinformation. I had a long technical explanation on the way ATF behaves under certain circumstances, and what actually causes "sludging" in a transmission, but it was more info than needed given his low fluid problem. I'll just summarize by saying ATF behaves very differently than standard engine or gear oil; whether it be excessive heat, lack of maintenance, or contaminates being introduced. You'd be correct if it were regular oil, but again ATF is very different.

This is from an automotive education, 4 years experience as a transmission specialist, and being an ASE certified automotive and diesel mechanic. Again, not trying to argue with you, just trying to clarify your misunderstanding. Unfortunately, I've pretty much seen it all when it comes to transmissions....it's saddening to see some of the things people do/don't do to take care of their vehicles.
 

·
-
Joined
·
1,750 Posts
This is not true, A MT has no real way of burning or using oil but an AT does. There are many clutch plates inside that can and will heat up if they are worn or warped they will create excess heat causing the oil to turn to a sludge mixture and decreasing the volume of the oil. This is the exact reason for an AT fluid cooler. I would take apart the cooler and flush it out to make sure there are no clogs, as well as replace the fluid.

This is a really bad post with incorrect information.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,513 Posts
Alright should have re read that after I typed it because it is mis leading. What I should have said is this:

Auto transmissions create alot of heat, much more than a MT. After about 200 *F (vague depending on the fluid of course) The fluid can start to cook, Once it starts to cook it turns into a caramelized thick substance which than will quickly start to burn. Which than changes to a gas stage and will leave the case from the vent hose, causing a lower level of fluid.

Hope that clears up what I was originally trying to explain
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
68 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I replaced the fluid the day I posted this and so far the level on the dipstick has not changed. Atleast not what I can see. I'm just curious as to why over a 10k mile time frame I had almost no fluid. I checked the underside etc and there is no obvious slow leak or anything. Any other suggestions? P.s. my boyfriend is very knowledgeable in the ins and outs of cars and is stumped. Please clarify - is it possible that the transmission fluid is turning to "sludge" because of heat or not? I've only had the car since February and it has given me no issues. The shifting is smooth and I only knew I was low because I decided to check the dipstick out of no where.

Sent from my DROID X2 using AutoGuide.Com Free App
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,513 Posts
I replaced the fluid the day I posted this and so far the level on the dipstick has not changed. Atleast not what I can see. I'm just curious as to why over a 10k mile time frame I had almost no fluid. I checked the underside etc and there is no obvious slow leak or anything. Any other suggestions? P.s. my boyfriend is very knowledgeable in the ins and outs of cars and is stumped. Please clarify - is it possible that the transmission fluid is turning to "sludge" because of heat or not? I've only had the car since February and it has given me no issues. The shifting is smooth and I only knew I was low because I decided to check the dipstick out of no where.

Sent from my DROID X2 using AutoGuide.Com Free App

If the trans is starting to slip you could be cooking the ATF. Especially if its happening every 10k. Also its not so much a "sludge" as it is a thicker substance as it starts to over heat it turns to a more caramelized type liquid. If it happens again I would bring it to a trans shop and have them look it over.

Also what color was the fluid when it was drained?
 
1 - 15 of 15 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top