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TSX_Clips
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163 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey guys, I'm looking at getting a set of pulleys, but apparently the UR pulleys cause a loss of power in the A/C is what I'm reading as I've browsed around... I also saw that UR makes the XLR8 pulley set with the stock diameter, so I could re-use my stock belt and no loss in power would occur, which would seem like the way to go. So, will it affect the A/C that much? Should I just go with the UR pulleys and not the XLR8? Or vice versa? Is there another big difference besides the diameter size between the two?
 

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Premium Member
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3,174 Posts
The ONLY reason not to get a UR underdrive pulley is if you are supercharged. This is why we offer 3-piece kits with both underdrive and stock diameter pulleys.

Pulley & Belt - HeelToe Automotive

The OEM pulley is good but really is not going to earn you any power. It is too heavy. Don't waste your money there.
 

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Tofu
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74 Posts
The ONLY reason not to get a UR underdrive pulley is if you are supercharged. This is why we offer 3-piece kits with both underdrive and stock diameter pulleys.

Pulley & Belt - HeelToe Automotive

The OEM pulley is good but really is not going to earn you any power. It is too heavy. Don't waste your money there.
Then would you not recommend getting the stock size XLR8 pulley if you are running a predominantly stock setup? I am looking for increased response without under-driving anything.
 

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Premium Member
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3,174 Posts
Then would you not recommend getting the stock size XLR8 pulley if you are running a predominantly stock setup? I am looking for increased response without under-driving anything.
Not necessarily. I guess if you were not supercharged the underdrive might but better, but if you did not want to underdrive then the stock one will help. It should help give more power and maybe a bit more responsiveness.
 

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Former Lude Driver
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65 Posts
Why waste your money on that stuff. You WILL NOT notice a difference with them. If you want response. Save those $390 and put it towards a reflash or flashpro. Even a lighter flywheel is a better option than pulleys.

EDIT: And if you've done all that, well then save up for boost because all the little things don't come close to the power/responsiveness you'd get from a turbo or supercharger. Be smart and don't waste your money!
 

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Former Lude Driver
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65 Posts
A lighter flywheel does the same thing as the pulley kit does. No, it is not a blow-you-away horsepower gain. But it does help a little, whether you can feel it or not right away.
I agree with you. But, from a cost/performance standpoint flywheel is a better option. I got 11.5 lb flywheel for $189 shipped. I saved about 7 lbs over stock. That's a lot better than $390 for the same. I'd be great to do them both, but that puts you into Flashpro range.

Flashpro gains some 28hp and about the same in tq. The tq curve is better everywhere, and responds great with mods. Easy to install, not changing any rotating parts on the engine. Only down side is that its $695.

So, to la_clippers11, I say again...SAVE YOUR MONEY. Spend it on what makes the biggest difference. Just my .02
 

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Former Lude Driver
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65 Posts
I respect your opinion... But, well, if we compare apples to apples... an 11 lb aluminum flywheel would weigh the same as an 11 lb steel flywheel. ;)

All jokes aside, I've seen Chromoly Steel goes down to about 8.5-9lbs...Doubt a DD car would want a lighter flywheel. Good luck slipping the clutch with anything lighter.

As far as heat...All Chromoly is heat treated and handles heat VERY well...It is the weapon of choice for OEM flywheels and many popular aftermarket brands. Chromoly Steel is even used for crankshafts for their durability and strength. So unless someone has a crap clutch that is slipping horribly and they are beating the crap out of their car, I have no idea how they could over heat and warp an 11.5 lbs flywheel. Maybe a torch?

Sure aluminum dissipates heat well but it also has a lot less strength compared to steel and can crack and aluminum ones are trash if they get cracked. :p

Even still! With all the "advantages" of aluminum, it doesn't justify spending another $100-150 for aluminum flywheel. You know its true!
 

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Premium Member
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I respect your opinion... But, well, if we compare apples to apples... an 11 lb aluminum flywheel would weigh the same as an 11 lb steel flywheel. ;)

All jokes aside, I've seen Chromoly Steel goes down to about 8.5-9lbs...Doubt a DD car would want a lighter flywheel. Good luck slipping the clutch with anything lighter.

As far as heat...All Chromoly is heat treated and handles heat VERY well...It is the weapon of choice for OEM flywheels and many popular aftermarket brands. Chromoly Steel is even used for crankshafts for their durability and strength. So unless someone has a crap clutch that is slipping horribly and they are beating the crap out of their car, I have no idea how they could over heat and warp an 11.5 lbs flywheel. Maybe a torch?

Sure aluminum dissipates heat well but it also has a lot less strength compared to steel and can crack and aluminum ones are trash if they get cracked. :p

Even still! With all the "advantages" of aluminum, it doesn't justify spending another $100-150 for aluminum flywheel. You know its true!
Weight has nothing to do with how easy a flywheel overheats. There is a reason why a twin disk clutch comes with a chromo steel fly wheel... Its far stronger and can take massive heat changes time after time. I personally would never run an aluminum flywheel
 

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Premium Member
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Well, you guys, I think, are just saying a chromoly wheel is stronger because for a given section of the same size chromoly is stronger than aluminum. But aluminum flywheels have more material than chromoly ones, making them perfectly adequate same in terms of strength. While on the subject, do you know what the minimum strength requirements of the flywheel are? I don't either. So who is to say more is better? It would be a ridiculous thing to claim as an advantage, saying "my flywheel can handle 500 ft-lbs and yours can only handle 450 ft-lbs"...when both of us are barely making 200. The idea that crankshafts are made of chromoly has absolutely nothing to do with the material needs of a flywheel.

Also, the heat treat argument is bologna (pronounced BA-LONE-EE ;) ). Heat treatment is not a process that is done to improve a material's ability to handle heat changes. It is a strengthening and hardening process. If not heat treated the steel wheel would be too weak and wear too fast anyway, even a chromoly one. Besides, any decent aluminum wheel is made from heat treated material as well to increase it's strength as well. De-bunk!

I am calling BS on both arguments of strength and temperature resistance. All in all, the weight of the wheel going down means an increase in performance. You should want to run the lightest possible (safe) wheel you can. The livability is going to be reduced a lot reducing from a stock wheel to a light weight one, and a couple more pounds is not going to be the end of the world for driving. Chromoly or aluminium really doesn't make much of a difference when we are talking lbs, you are right. But I am pretty sure either part can be made unsafely, so yeah there is a limit to how light I'd go with either material. Let's leave the heresay on the bench though. We sell aluminum flywheels under 7-8 lbs...they are for 1.5L 12-valve Civic motors making 97 hp. Means nothing here.

When it comes time to replace the clutch again you can toss your chromoly one in the trash (I would not suggest resurfacing one) or get a new friction disc for your aluminum one. There should be plenty of savings there to offset the initial cost difference.
 
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